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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Place captive young with captive foster parents Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Key messages

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  • Two studies evaluated the effects of placing captive young mammals with captive foster parents. One study was in the USA and one was in Sweden and Norway.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (2 STUDIES)

  • Survival (2 studies): A replicated, controlled study in the USA found that most captive coyote pups placed with foster parents were successfully reared. A replicated study in Sweden and Norway found that captive grey wolf pups placed with foster parents had higher survival rates than pups that stayed with their biological mother.
  • Condition (1 study): A replicated study in Sweden and Norway found that captive grey wolf pups placed with foster parents weighed less than pups that stayed with their biological mother.

BEHAVIOUR (0 STUDIES)

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A replicated, controlled study (year not stated) in a captive animal facility in Utah, USA (Kitchen & Knowlton 2006) found that most coyote Canis latrans pups placed with foster parents in captivity were successfully reared. All eight pups fostered into four litters at <1 week old survived beyond six weeks of age. Of six 3–4-week-old pups fostered into three litters, four pups in two litters survived beyond six weeks old. The two pups in the third litter died. Two attempts each to foster two 6–7-week-old pups failed, with pups dying within 24 hours. All pups born into these litters survived. The survival rate of litters fostered in their entirety when <10 days old (17 out of 19 pups surviving from four litters) was similar to that in litters not fostered (18 out of 20 pups surviving from four litters). Causes of death were not established for pups that died. Litters of eight coyote pairs were augmented by adding two additional pups, four litters were replaced completely and four litters were reared by their parents without additions. Survival was monitored to six weeks of age.

2 

A replicated study in 2011 in six zoos in Sweden and Norway (Scharis & Amundin 2015) found that grey wolf Canis lupus lupus pups placed with foster parents in captivity had higher survival rates but weighed less than pups that stayed with their biological mother. After 32 weeks, more fostered cubs survived (75%) than cubs that remained with their biological mother (65%). At 24–26 days age, fostered cubs weighed less (1,337 g) than cubs that remained with their biological mother (2,019 g). In 2011, eight pups born at zoos were removed from their biological mothers at 4–6 days of age. Pups were microchipped, to allow identification, given fluids to reduce dehydration, and transported by car or plane to new zoos. Foster pups were placed in litters containing 7–10 pups. On arrival, the tails of foster pups were rubbed in the urine of other pups so that they smelled similar. A total of 35 pups stayed with their biological mother. Cameras were placed at the den of each litter. Pups were weighed at irregular intervals and all deaths recorded.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Littlewood, N.A., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K., Martin, P.A., Lockhart, S.L., Schoonover, R.F., Wilman, E., Bladon, A.J., Sainsbury, K.A., Pimm S. and Sutherland, W.J. (2020) Terrestrial Mammal Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions for terrestrial mammals excluding bats and primates. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.