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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Place orphaned or abandoned wild young with captive foster parents Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Key messages

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  • Two studies evaluated the effects of placing orphaned or abandoned wild young with captive foster parents. One study was in Canada and one was in the USA.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Survival (1 study): A controlled study in the USA found that stranded sea otter pups reared in captivity by foster mothers had higher post-release survival than did unfostered pups reared mostly alone, and similar survival to wild pups.

BEHAVIOUR (2 STUDIES)

Behaviour change (2 studies): A study in Canada found that a captive white-tailed deer adopted a wild orphaned fawn. A controlled study in the USA found that stranded sea otter pups reared in captivity by foster mothers began foraging earlier than did unfostered pups reared mostly alone.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A study in 1993 in a captive facility in New Brunswick, Canada (Greaves & Duffy 1994) found that a captive white-tailed deer Odocileus virginianus adopted a wild orphaned fawn. The fawn was around one week old when rescued and was initially hand-fed. After five days, a captive white-tailed deer doe gave birth to a stillborn fawn. The following day, the orphaned fawn was placed with the doe. It was initially ignored, and hand-feeding continued. One day later, the hide of the stillborn fawn was wrapped around the orphaned fawn. The doe proceeded to lick the hide and nursed the fawn thereafter, even after the hide became detached after five hours, due to vigorous licking. The study took place in a captive research facility to which the orphaned fawn was delivered on 9 June 1993. Attachment of the hide, and adoption by the doe took place on 15 June 1993.

2 

A controlled study in 1986–2004 at an aquarium and coastal site in California, USA (Nicholson et al. 2007) found that stranded sea otter Enhydra lutris pups reared in captivity by foster mothers began foraging earlier and had greater survival in the wild than unfostered pups, and similar survival to wild pups. Fostered sea otter pups began foraging independently on live prey at younger ages (average 8–19 weeks old) than unfostered pups reared mostly alone (average 11–22 weeks old). A greater proportion of fostered pups survived at least one year after release (5 of 7 pups; 71%) than unfostered pups (8 of 26 pups; 31%), and survival was similar to wild pups (9 of 12 pups; 75%). In 2001–2003, seven stranded sea otter pups were brought into captivity and reared with adult female sea otters. In 1986–2000, twenty-six stranded sea otter pups were reared in captivity without foster mothers (mostly alone). All pups were rehabilitated at the same aquarium. Before release, pups were implanted with radio-transmitters and individually tagged. After release in 1987–2004, the rehabilitated otters were monitored daily during the first month and then twice weekly for up to 12 months. Twelve wild juvenile male sea otter pups were observed during a field study prior to 2003 (date not reported).

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Littlewood, N.A., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K., Martin, P.A., Lockhart, S.L., Schoonover, R.F., Wilman, E., Bladon, A.J., Sainsbury, K.A., Pimm S. and Sutherland, W.J. (2020) Terrestrial Mammal Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions for terrestrial mammals excluding bats and primates. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.