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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Reinstate bat roosts in felled tree trunks Bat Conservation

Key messages

Read our guidance on Key messages before continuing

  • One study evaluated the effects of reinstating a bat roost within a felled tree trunk on bat populations. The study was in the UK.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

USAGE (1 STUDY)     

  • Use (1 study): One before-and-after study in the UK found that a roost reinstated by attaching the felled tree trunk to a nearby tree continued to be used by common noctule bats as a maternity roost.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A before-and-after study in 2009–2013 in a broadleaf woodland in Milton Keynes, UK (Damant & Dickens 2013) found that a roost reinstated by attaching the felled tree trunk to a nearby tree continued to be used by common noctule bats Nyctalus noctula as a maternity roost. A similar number of bats used the roost before (47–75 bats) and after (37–46 bats) felling and reinstatement of the roost, although no statistical tests were carried out. The roost was located in an ash Fraxinus excelsior tree within a 23 ha ancient semi-natural woodland. The tree was accidentally felled in December 2011. The tree trunk was reinstated within five days of felling by attaching it to a nearby tree using 19 mm steel banding and rubber straps. The access points were orientated to recreate their original positions prior to felling. A replacement top was constructed from ash wood to shelter the roost. The reinstated section and top was 3.4 m high x 0.5 m wide. Emergence counts were carried out at the roost twice in 2010 before felling and once/year in 2012 and 2013 after reinstatement.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Berthinussen, A., Richardson O.C. and Altringham J.D. (2019) Bat Conservation. Pages 67-140 in: W.J. Sutherland, L.V. Dicks, N. Ockendon, S.O. Petrovan & R.K. Smith (eds) What Works in Conservation 2019. Open Book Publishers, Cambridge, UK.