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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Relocate bat colonies roosting inside dams Bat Conservation

Key messages

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  • One study evaluated the effects of relocating bat colonies inside dams on bat populations. The study was in Argentina.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Abundance (1 study): One study in Argentina found that almost two-thirds of a large colony of Brazilian free-tailed bats relocated to a different dam compartment five months after being displaced from six compartments where the colony originally roosted.

USAGE (0 STUDIES)  

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A study in 2002–2003 at one dam reservoir in Tucumán Province, Argentina (Regidor et al 2003) found that almost two-thirds of a large colony of Brazilian free-tailed bats Tadarida brasiliensis relocated to a different internal dam compartment after being displaced from the six compartments where the colony originally roosted. Approximately 1,400,000 Brazilian free-tailed bats were estimated to be roosting in one dam compartment five months after the displacement of a colony of approximately 2,000,000 bats from six of the seven dam compartments where it previously roosted. The study was conducted inside a dam wall (100 m long, 90 m high). The wall housed seven compartments used by Brazilian free-tailed bats. In October 2012, bats were deterred from six of the seven compartments using high intensity lights and naphthalene vapour. Once empty of bats, the dam compartments were sealed with metal doors. Bat numbers were estimated by three observers based on the area occupied by each single bat. Bats were counted three times between October 2002 and March 2003.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Berthinussen, A., Richardson O.C. and Altringham J.D. (2019) Bat Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.