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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Artificial stimulation of group display and nesting behaviour in a reintroduced population of Caribbean flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber on Guana Island, British Virgin Islands

Published source details

O'Connell-Rodwell C.E., Rojek N., Rodwell T.C. & Shannon P.W. (2004) Artificially induced group display and nesting behaviour in a reintroduced population of Caribbean flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber ruber. Bird Conservation International, 14, 55-62


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use artificial visual and auditory stimuli to induce breeding in wild populations Bird Conservation

A small before-and-after study in the British Virgin Islands, Caribbean in 1992 (O'Connell-Rodwell et al. 2004) found there was an increase in group display and nest-building behaviour in a population of six (two females, four males) Caribbean flamingos Phoenicopterus ruber, following the introduction of ten life-sized flamingo decoys, eight artificially constructed mud nests (some with artificial eggs) and the playback of recordings of display vocalisations (3.6% of behavioural records in the two weeks after stimuli introduction were related to group display vs. no records in 12 hours before stimuli introduction).