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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Attitudes of Namibian commercial farmers toward large carnivores : the influence of conservancy membership

Published source details

Schumann M., Watson L.H. & Schumann B.D. (2008) Attitudes of Namibian commercial farmers toward large carnivores : the influence of conservancy membership. South African Journal of Wildlife Research, 38, 123-132


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Encourage community-based participation in land management Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2003–2004 of farmers across a large rangeland area in Namibia (Schumann et al. 2008) found that fewer farmers who engaged in community-based management of land through being members of a conservancy removed large carnivores from their land than did non-conservancy members. A lower percentage of conservancy members (57–67%) removed large carnivores compared to non-conservancy members (81–83%). Conservancies were legally protected areas, cooperatively managed by a group of land-occupiers with the goal of sharing resources among members. Some conservancy members derived income from trophy hunting of carnivores. A total of 147 farmers were surveyed from across 30,000 km2 of rangeland. They comprised 76 conservancy members (44 mixed farmers, 32 livestock farmers) and 71 non-conservancy members (33 mixed farmers, 38 livestock farmers). Data were collected by face-to-face interviews or by postal questionnaires in 2003–2004.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)