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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Do ranger stations deter poaching activity in national parks in Thailand?

Published source details

Jenks K.E., Howard J. & Leimgruber P. (2012) Do ranger stations deter poaching activity in national parks in Thailand? Biotropica, 44, 826-833


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide/increase anti-poaching patrols Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2003–2007 in forest in a national park in central Thailand (Jenks et al. 2012) found that, close to ranger stations, deer and small mammals were more abundant than further away. Sambar deer Rusa unicolor, red muntjac Muntiacus muntjak and a range of small prey species were more likely to be found close to ranger stations than further away (modelled result – data not presented). Poachers were also more likely to be found within 5 km of ranger stations than further away within the national park. Authors suggest that this may be due to roads making ranger stations more accessible and possibly complicity of ranger staff. The national park was 2,168 km2 in area. Camera traps were operated in 217 locations over 6,260 total trap nights from October 2003 to March 2007, to survey animals and poacher presence. Cameras were placed across 22 park management zones.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)