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Individual study: Hedgerow presence does not enhance indicators of nest-site habitat quality or nesting rates of ground-nesting bees

Published source details

Sardiñas H.S., Ponisio L.C. & Kremen C. (2016) Hedgerow presence does not enhance indicators of nest-site habitat quality or nesting rates of ground-nesting bees. Restoration Ecology, 24, 499-505


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Plant hedgerows Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in farmland in the Central Valley, California, USA (years of study not reported), found similar soil structure in field edges with or without planted hedgerows. Soil erosion and aggregation: Similar particle sizes were found in soils with or without planted hedgerows (data reported as statistical results). Methods: Eight fields with planted hedgerows (mostly Californian native shrubs and forbs, at least five years after planting) were compared with eight field edges without planted hedgerows. Two soil samples were collected from each site (0–10 cm depth).

 

Pollination: Plant hedgerows Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in farmland in the Central Valley, California, USA (years of study not reported), found fewer ground-nesting bees in planted hedgerows, compared to unplanted field edges. Pollinator numbers: Fewer ground-nesting bees were found in planted hedgerows, compared to unplanted edges (13 vs 33 individuals/site), but there were similar numbers of flower-visiting bees (data reported as statistical results), and similar numbers of bee species (2.9 vs 3.2 rarified species richness). Indicators of ground-nesting bee habitat did not differ between planted hedgerows and unplanted edges (data on bare ground, soil compaction, particle size, and surface heterogeneity reported as statistical results). Methods: Eight field edges with planted hedgerows (mostly Californian native shrubs and forbs, at least five years after planting) were compared to eight field edges without planted hedgerows. Ground-nesting bees were sampled with emergence traps (0.6 m2, 30 traps/site/sample, three samples in two years, in May–August). Foraging bees were netted on inflorescences (one hour/site/sample, within 10 days of emergence samples). Nesting indicators were assessed using soil samples (0–10 cm depth, two samples/site) and visual estimates.