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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Predator control to enhance breeding success of the New Zealand fairy tern Sterna nereis davisae, North Island, New Zealand

Published source details

Wilson T. & Hansen K. (2005) Predator control to enhance breeding success of the New Zealand fairy tern Sterna nereis davisae, North Island, New Zealand. Conservation Evidence, 2, 89-89


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Control predators not on islands for seabirds Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study at three sites in northern North Island, New Zealand (Wilson & Hansen), found that the population of New Zealand fairy terns Sterna nereis davisae increased from a low of five breeding pairs in 1987 and an annual decline of 1.5% to between 35 and 40 individuals in 2005 and an annual increase of 1.4%, following the continual trapping of introduced mammalian predators (feral cats Felis catus, hedgehogs Erinaceus europaeus, stoats Mustela erminia, ferrets M. putorius, weasels M. nivalis, Australian brush-tailed possums Trichosurus vulpecula and rats Rattus spp.) from 1992 onwards. On average 100 hedgehogs and 12 cats were trapped each year.