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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Drive wild animals away using domestic animals of the same species to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Key messages

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  • One study evaluated the effects of using domestic animals to drive away wild mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict. This study was in India.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

BEHAVIOUR (0 STUDIES)

OTHER (1 STUDY)

  • Human-wildlife conflict (1 study): One study in India found that using domestic elephants to drive wild Asian elephants away from villages did not reduce the probability of elephants damaging crops.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A study in 2006–2009, in two areas of Assam, India (Davies et al. 2011) found that using domestic elephants to drive wild Asian elephants Elephas maximus away from villages did not reduce the probability of elephants damaging crops. The chance of crop damage occurring was not lower when domestic elephants were used to deter crop-raiding wild elephants, in comparison with a range of other interventions or no intervention (results presented as statistical model coefficients). Within two study areas, 33 community members trained as monitors recorded 1,761 crop-raiding incidents, from 1 March 2006 to 28 February 2009. A range of deterrence methods was used, singly or in combination, including using domesticated elephants to repel wild elephants, chili smoke (from burning dried chilies, tobacco, and straw), spotlights, two-strand electric fences, chili fencing (engine grease and ground chili paste, on a jute or coconut rope), fire and noise.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Littlewood, N.A., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K., Martin, P.A., Lockhart, S.L., Schoonover, R.F., Wilman, E., Bladon, A.J., Sainsbury, K.A., Pimm S. and Sutherland, W.J. (2020) Terrestrial Mammal Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions for terrestrial mammals excluding bats and primates. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.