Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Bacterial protein grown on natural gas in diets for Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, in freshwater

Published source details

Storebakken T., Baeverfjord G., Skrede A., Olli J.J. & Berge G.M. (2004) Bacterial protein grown on natural gas in diets for Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, in freshwater. Aquaculture, 241, 413-425


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Use an alternative protein source: bacteria Sustainable Aquaculture

A controlled, replicated study in Norway (Storebakken et al., 2004) found mixed results when comparing growth rates in salmon fry, Salmo salar, fed diets containing 100% fish meal (control) compared to those fed experimental diets containing up to 50% bacterial protein as a fish meal replacement. After 112 days, fish fed a diet containing 6.25 % bacterial protein weighed more (3.69kg) than fish fed diets containing 12.5 %, 25 % and 50 % bacterial protein (3.24kg, 3.03kg and 2.63kg, respectively) or the control diet (3.44kg). From days 113 to 364, growth rates in fish fed the control diet and bacterial protein replacement diets up to 25% were similar. In the 50% replacement diet, growth rates were lower. Salmon were fed diets in which bacterial protein made up 6.25%, 12.5%, 25% and 50% of total dietary amino acids, replacing fish meal or a control diet made up of 100% fish meal. Each diet was fed to groups of salmon fry for 364 days and fish were weighed every 28 days.