Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control

How is the evidence assessed?
  • Effectiveness
    69%
  • Certainty
    62%
  • Harms
    10%

Source countries

Key messages

  • Twenty-two studies evaluated the effects of releasing translocated or captive-bred mammals in areas with eradication or control of invasive or problematic species. Sixteen studies were in Australia, four were in the USA, and one in the UK.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (21 STUDIES)

  • Abundance (4 studies): A replicated study in Australia found that increasing amounts of regular predator control increased population numbers of released captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots. Two studies in Australia found that following eradication or control of invasive species, a population of translocated and released captive-bred burrowing bettongs increased and a population of translocated western barred bandicoots increased over four years. A study in Australia found that following the release of captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies and subsequent predator controls, numbers increased over a three years, but remained low compared to the total number released.
  • Reproductive success (2 studies): A study in Australia found that four of five captive-bred mammal populations released into a predator-free enclosure and one population released into a predator-reduced enclosure produced a second generation, whereas two populations released into an unfenced area with ongoing predator management did not survive to reproduce. A study in Australia found that most female captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies released into a large predator-free fenced area reproduced.
  • Survival (18 studies): Ten studies (one controlled, three replicated, two before-and-after studies) in Australia, and the UK found that following the eradication/control of invasive species (and in some cases release into a fenced area), a translocated population of woylies, western barred bandicoots and red-tailed phascogales survived over four years, released captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots survived up to three years at five of seven sites, offspring of translocated golden bandicoots survived three years, over half of released captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies survived over two years, captive-bred water voles survived for at least 20 months or over 11 months at over half of release sites, most released captive-bred hare-wallabies survived at least two months, most captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots survived for over three weeks. A replicated study in Australia found that after the control of invasive species, four translocated populations of burrowing bettongs died out within four months. A review of studies in Australia found that in seven studies where red fox control was carried out before or after the release of captive-bred eastern-barred bandicoots, survival varied. A study in Australia found that four of five captive-bred mammal populations released into a predator-free enclosure and one population released into a predator-reduced enclosure survived, whereas two populations released into an unfenced area with ongoing predator management did not. A study in Australia found that captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies released from holding pens in areas where predators had been controlled had similar annual survival rates to that of wild-born translocated animals. Two studies (one replicated) in the USA found that where predators were managed, at least half of released captive-bred black-footed ferrets survived more than two weeks, but that post-release mortality was higher than resident wild ferrets. A before-and-after study in the USA found following the onset of translocations of black bears away from an elk calving site, survival of the offspring of translocated elk increased.
  • Condition (2 studies): A study Australia found that wild-born golden bandicoots, descended from a translocated population released into a predator-free enclosure, maintained genetic diversity relative to the founder and source populations. A replicated, before-and-after study in Australia found that one to two years after release into predator-free fenced reserves, translocated eastern bettongs weighed more and had improved nutritional status compared to before release.

BEHAVIOUR (1 STUDY)

  • Behaviour change (1 study): A replicated, before-and-after study in the USA found that translocated Utah prairie dogs released after the control of native predators into an area with artificial burrows showed low site fidelity and different pre- and post-release behaviour.

About key messages

Key messages provide a descriptive index to studies we have found that test this intervention.

Studies are not directly comparable or of equal value. When making decisions based on this evidence, you should consider factors such as study size, study design, reported metrics and relevance of the study to your situation, rather than simply counting the number of studies that support a particular interpretation.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

  1. A study in 1993–1999 on an arid peninsula in Western Australia, Australia (Short & Turner 2000) found that following eradication of invasive species from a fenced area, a released population of burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur increased. In 1999, six years after initial releases, the population was estimated at 263–301 bettongs, with 340 individuals born between 1995 and 1999. The population died out due to fox incursion in 1994, but was re-established with further releases. In 1990, a 1.6-m tall wire mesh fence (with an external overhang, an apron to prevent burrowing and two electrified wires) was erected to enclose a 12-km2 peninsular, within which foxes Vulpes vulpes and cats Felis catus were eliminated by poisoning in 1991 and 1995, respectively. Outside the fence foxes were controlled by biannual aerial baiting with meat containing 1080 toxin, distributed at 10 baits/km2 over 200 km2. From October 1993, an additional 200 baits/month were distributed along the fence and roads across the study area. Cats were controlled by trapping and poisoning in a 100 km2 buffer zone. In May 1992 and September 1993, twenty-two wild-caught bettongs were transferred to an 8-ha in-situ captive-breeding pen. In September 1993 and October 1995, twenty wild-caught bettongs were translocated to range freely in the reserve. From 1993–1998, one hundred and fourteen captive-bred bettongs were released. Artificial warrens and supplementary food and water were provided in 1993, but not for later releases. Eighty released bettongs were radio-tagged. From 1991–1995, European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were controlled within the fenced area using 1080 ‘one shot’ oats. Bettongs were monitored every three months using cage traps set over two consecutive nights, at both 100-m intervals along approximately 40 km of track, and at warrens used by radio-collared individuals.

    Study and other actions tested
  2. A study in 1996–1999 at a woodland reserve in Queensland, Australia (Pople et al. 2001) found that captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies Onychogalea fraenata released from holding pens in areas where mammalian predators had been controlled had similar annual survival rates to that of wild-born translocated animals. Over four years, the average annual survival of released captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies (57–92%) did not differ significantly from that of wild-born translocated animals (77–80%). In 1996–1998, one hundred and twenty-four captive-bred and nine wild-born translocated bridled nailtail wallabies were released into three sites across Idalia National Park. Ten captive-bred wallabies were held in a 10-ha enclosure within the reserve for six months before release, and 85 were bred within the 10-ha enclosure. All of the 133 released wallabies were kept in a holding pen (30-m diameter) for one week at each site before release. Mammalian predators were culled at release sites. A total of 67 wallabies (58 captive-bred, nine wild-born) were radio-tagged and tracked every 2–7 days in 1996–1998. Wallabies were live-trapped at irregular intervals with 20–35 wire cage traps in 1997–1999.

    Study and other actions tested
  3. A study in 1992–1996 in a forest reserve in Western Australia, Australia (Kinnear et al. 2002) found that following baiting with poison to control red foxes Vulpes vulpes, a translocated population of woylies Bettongia penicillata persisted over four years. Four years after translocation into a site where red foxes were controlled, eight woylies were captured in one part of the site and 59 in another part. Foxes were controlled using poisoned baits started in 1985 in one part of the Boyagin Nature Reserve (4,780 ha) and in 1989 in another part of the reserve. Baits (1080-poison meat baits or intact fowl eggs) were deployed monthly. Forty woylies (28 female, 12 male) were translocated to the reserve in 1992. No further details of the translocation are provided. Woylies were live-trapped over 150 trap nights in each part of the reserve in 1996, using baited wire cage traps set at 100-m intervals. Traps were set at dusk and cleared each morning.

    Study and other actions tested
  4. A study in 1995–1999 on an arid peninsula in Western Australia, Australia (Richards & Short 2003) found that following control of invasive species, a translocated population of western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville persisted and increased in numbers over four years. Six out of 14 translocated western barred bandicoots (43%) survived over one month after release into a predator-free enclosure. From 51 bandicoots then released from this enclosure, the population increased to an estimated 130 individuals by two years after releases commenced. In 1995–1996, fourteen bandicoots were trapped in Dorre Island and released into a 17-ha enclosure. Invasive predators were unable to enter the enclosure and European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus and Gould's monitors Varanus gouldii were controlled by trapping. In 1997 and 1999, bandicoots were released from this enclosure into the larger study area, a 12-km2 mainland peninsula. This was fenced to exclude alien predators, though was occasionally accessed by foxes Vulpes vulpes and cats Felis cattus. Bandicoots were monitored by radio-tracking within the predator-free enclosure. Following release, they were live-trapped at three-month intervals, over 2–4 nights, on a 50-m grid.

    Study and other actions tested
  5. A study in 2001 in a grassy woodland site in Melbourne, Australia (Long et al. 2005) found that following control of red foxes Vulpes vulpes, and release of captive-bred animals, most eastern barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii survived for at least five weeks. After five weeks, seven of 10 released bandicoots were known to be alive. Despite control, red foxes were recorded in all monitoring locations. In May 2001, poison-laced baits were buried at 28 locations, 180 m apart, in an effort to control red foxes. In July 2001, ten captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots were released into a 400-ha reserve. To monitor bandicoot survival, 180 live traps, baited with oats, peanut butter and honey, were distributed over a 9-ha area. Trapping was carried out on seven occasions over a five-week period, with traps set for two consecutive days each time and with two to four days between trapping. Twenty-nine 1-m2 pads, covered in sand, were placed close to vehicle tracks and the presence of fox prints was recorded every weekday, in March–August 2001.

    Study and other actions tested
  6. A controlled, before-and-after study in 2001 in five shrubland sites in Western Australia, Australia (Hardman & Moro 2006) found that following control of introduced mammals, most captive-bred banded hare-wallabies Lagostrophus fasciatus and rufous hare-wallabies Lagorchestes hirsutus survived at least two months after being released into a fenced peninsula (some from holding pens and all with supplementary food and water provided). After 1-2 months, 10 of 16 rufous hare-wallabies and 12 of 18 banded hare-wallabies were still alive. Overall both rufous and banded hare-wallabies recaptured had similar body conditions to when they were released, although rufous hare-wallabies lost 12% of their body condition while waiting for release in holding pens (data presented as a body condition index; see paper for details). Sixteen captive-bred rufous hare-wallabies and 18 captive-bred banded hare-wallabies were released at five sites in August 2001. Six rufous hare-wallabies and nine banded-hare wallabies were placed in separate 3-ha enclosures with electrified fencing for 10–19 days before being released. Remaining animals were released directly into the wild. Supplementary food (kangaroo pellets, alfalfa) and water were made available to all hare-wallabies (those kept in holding pens and those not; feeding duration not given). Hare-wallabies were monitored by radio tracking (once/week for 1.5 years after release) and live-trapping (at 4 and 8-9 weeks after release). Release areas were within a fenced peninsula where multiple introduced mammals were controlled (cats Felis catus and goats Capra hircus) or eradicated (red fox Vulpes vulpes).

    Study and other actions tested
  7. A review of eight studies in 1989-2005 in eight grassland and woodland sites in Victoria, Australia (Winnard & Coulson 2008) found that in seven studies where red fox Vulpes vulpes control was carried out before or after the release of captive-bred eastern-barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii, survival rates of populations varied. In sites with fox control, two bandicoot populations increased for at least five years after releases began and there was evidence of breeding and wild-born pouch young maturing to adults. These populations subsequently declined to low numbers 12-15 years after the original releases began. A further population survived at least one year and both pouch young and wild-born adults were observed. However, two populations went extinct after five years, and two populations declined and management ceased (due to low detection rates) after 9-10 years. In a site without proactive fox control, released bandicoots survived and bred for at least seven years with the population comprising 74% wild-born offspring two years after releases began. Between 22 and 207 bandicoots were released into sites (85-585 ha) with fox control and 85 bandicoots were released a site with no proactive fox management (200 ha) in 1989-2005. Captive-bred bandicoots were released in stages in each site. Red fox Vulpes vulpes were controlled by shooting, use of 1080 poison bait, or a combination thereof before and/or after releases. In two sites with fox control, invasive European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were also culled. Supplementary food was provided in two sites with fox management (in one for 6-10 days after release, the other was not specified). In most sites, bandicoots were monitored by live-trapping but frequency and methods are not detailed.

    Study and other actions tested
  8. A replicated study in 2005–2008 at 12 riverside sites in the Upper Thames region, UK (Moorhouse et al. 2009) found following American mink Neovison vison control, captive-bred water voles Arvicola terrestris survived over 11 months at more than half of release sites. Water voles persisted over 11 months at seven out of 12 sites (58%). Voles were released at 12 sites where previous populations had been eradicated due to mink predation. Sites were >5 km apart and comprised suitable riparian habitat on which mink control took place. Either 44 or 45 voles were released at each site, in early May of 2005–2007. Release sites had 20–22 predator-proof release pens. Pens were 120 × 120 cm cross section, 60 cm high and buried 15–20 cm into the ground. Food and water was provided for seven days but most voles burrowed out of pens within 2–3 days. Voles were monitored monthly for five months post-release, using live traps, 15 m apart along each site, over four days. Sites were checked for vole signs in the April after release.

    Study and other actions tested
  9. A replicated study in 1990–2001 in seven grassland, wetland and forest sites in Victoria, Australia (Cook et al. 2010) found that increasing amounts of regular predator control increased population numbers of released captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii,and bandicoots were recorded at five of seven sites up to three years after the last release. Greater amounts of predator control had a positive influence on the number of bandicoot signs found at each site (Sites with 0-2 methods of regular predator control: 0 bandicoots/site; sites with 3+ methods: 0.3-2 bandicoots/site). Bandicoot signs were found in five of the seven release sites (average 0.3–2 signs/quadrat) but no signs were detected in two sites. At each of seven sites (88–500 ha), 50–129 captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots were released between 1990 and 1999. Combinations of regular predator control methods employed (e.g. poisoning, shooting, destruction of red fox Vulpes vulpes dens) differed between the sites (1 site: no predator control; 1 site: 2 methods used; 2 sites: 3 methods used (including 1 site with partial fencing); 3 sites: 4 methods used (including 1 site with full predator-proof fencing). Bandicoot signs (fresh diggings and scats) were collected at 10 randomly distributed 5-m2 quadrats/site on two occasions in 2000–2001.

    Study and other actions tested
  10. A study in 1991 at a grassland site in Wyoming, USA (Biggins et al. 2011) found that following predator management, captive-born black-footed ferrets Mustela nigripes released from holding pens had higher post-release mortality than did resident wild ferrets. The estimated one-month survival rate for captive-born released ferrets (49%) was lower than that for free-ranging wild ferrets at their ancestral site (93%). Of animals known to have died, five were predated by coyotes Canis latrans, one by a badger Taxidea taxus, one by a golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos and two died of starvation. Black-footed ferrets were extirpated in the wild in 1985–1986. Thirty-seven captive-bred ferrets were released in September–November 1991, when 4–6 months old, onto a white-tailed prairie dog Cynomys leucurus colony. Before releases, 66 coyotes and 63 badgers were removed from the site. Ferrets spent two weeks in acclimatisation cages at the reintroduction site before release. Dead prairie dogs were provided in the cage for 10 days post-release. Ferrets were monitored by radio-tracking for ≤42 days after release.

    Study and other actions tested
  11. A study in 1998-2010 in a desert site in South Australia (Moseby et al. 2011) found that four of five captive-bred mammal populations released into a predator-free enclosure and one population released into a predator-reduced enclosure survived, increased their distribution and produced a second generation, whereas two populations released into an unfenced area with ongoing predator management did not persist. After release into a fenced enclosure where red foxes Vulpes vulpes, cats Felis catus and rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus had been eradicated, greater stick-nest rats Leporillus conditor, burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur, western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville and greater bilbies Macrotis lagotis were detected for eight years, increased their distribution within five years and produced a second generation within two years, but numbats Myrmecobius fasciatus were only detected for three years and did not produce a second generation. Burrowing bettongs released into a fenced enclosure with cats and rabbits but no foxes survived and increased their distribution over at least three years and produced a second generation within two years. Greater bilbies and burrowing bettongs released into an unfenced area with some predator management did not survive to produce a second generation or increase their distribution. In 1998–2005, five numbats, 106 greater stick-nest rats (6 captive-bred individuals), 30 burrowing bettongs, 12 western barred bandicoots and nine greater bilbies (all captive-bred) were released into a 14-km2 invasive-species-free fenced area. Rabbits, cats and foxes were eradicated within the fenced area in 1999. All western barred bandicoots and greater bilbies, and some greater stick-nest rats (8 individuals) and burrowing bettongs (10 individuals) were put into a 10-ha holding pen before full release after a few months. All other animals were released directly into the larger fenced area. In 2004-2008, thirty-two greater bilbies and 15 burrowing bettongs were translocated to an unfenced area (200 km2) where invasive predators (cats and foxes) were managed with lethal controls and dingoes Canis lupus dingo were excluded by a fence on one side. In 2008, sixty-six burrowing bettongs were released into a 26 km2 fenced area which contained small cat and rabbit populations as a result of previous eradication attempts. Between 2000 and 2010, animals were monitored using track counts, burrow monitoring and radio-tracking.

    Study and other actions tested
  12. A replicated study in 1996–1997 in three grassland sites in South Dakota, USA (Poessel et al. 2011) found that at least half of captive-bred black-footed ferrets Mustela nigripes released into an area where predators were managed survived more than two weeks. At each of the three sites, 48% (12 of 25), 50% (9 of 18) and 89% (32 of 36) of captive-bred ferrets released into the wild survived for at least two weeks (long term survival is not reported). Overall, twenty-four ferrets were killed by native predators (mostly great-horned owls Bubo virginianus and coyotes Canis latrans) and the cause of death of two others could not be determined. A total of 79 captive-bred black-footed ferrets were released across three mixed-grass prairie sites (18–36 ferrets/site) in September–October 1996 and October–November 1997. Low-to-moderate lethal coyote control took place for 2-3 weeks each year prior to ferrets being released. A 107 cm high electric fencing was installed in each release site (creating 2 km2 enclosures) and activated 1-2 weeks prior to ferrets being released. Ferrets were able to move in and out of the fenced areas. Each of the 79 ferrets was radio-tagged and tracked every 5–30 min/night for two weeks post-release in 1996–1997.

    Study and other actions tested
  13. A before-and-after study in 2006–2008 in a temperate forest area in Tennessee and North Carolina, USA (Yarkovich et al. 2011) found following the onset of translocations of black bears Ursus americanus away from an elk Cervus canadensis calving site, survival of the offspring of translocated elk increased. A higher proportion of elk calves survived their first year during bear translocations (69%) than before (59%). In 2001–2002, fifty-two elk were translocated to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Calf survival was monitored in 2001–2006 in a previous study that indicated that black bears predated nine out of 13 elk calves killed by predators. In 2006–2008, forty-nine black bears were relocated >40 km away from the elk calving area. In 2006–2008, forty-nine elk births were documented from which 42 recently-born calves were radio-collared. Calf survival was monitored by radio-tracking and visual observation.

    Study and other actions tested
  14. A study in 2001–2008 in a forest reserve in Queensland, Australia (Kingsley et al. 2012) found that following the release of captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies Onychogalea fraenata and subsequent predator controls, numbers increased over a three-year period, but remained low compared to the total number released. Three years after the last release event, the estimated bridled nailtail wallaby population (31 individuals) was higher than at the time of the last release (15 individuals) but was lower than the total number that had been released (166 individuals). In 2001–2005, groups of 1–20 captive-bred wallabies were released on 14 occasions into a 565-ha private forest reserve. Ninety-seven wallabies were kept in two 50 × 50-m predator-proof holding pens for one week before release. Sixty-nine wallabies infested with parasites were treated before release. Predator control was carried out in 2004–2008. Wallabies were trapped in a 2-km2 area with 5–45 wire cage traps during 7–22 nights on eight occasions in 2005–2008.

    Study and other actions tested
  15. A before-and-after study in 2006–2010 in a river catchment in Herefordshire, UK (Reynolds et al. 2013) found that alongside control of invasive American mink Neovison vison, a released captive-bred water vole Arvicola amphibious population persisted for at least 20 months. Following releases of water voles over three years along a river where American mink were being controlled, the population persisted through to 20 months after the final release. At this time, voles occupied 13.3 km of river and authors reported that numbers remained fairly constant. Between March 2006 and February 2010, one hundred and fifteen mink were captured. Mink control entailed use of 44–114 mink rafts along 63–203 km of river within the catchment. Seven hundred captive-bred water voles were released, along the main channel of the River Dore, in August–September of 2006–2008. Voles were released from boxes in groups of up to six animals/box. Boxes were ≥25 m apart. Food was provided daily until voles vacated boxes (typically within three days). Vole signs (food stores, feedings signs and faeces) were monitored annually, each April or May, in 2007–2010.

    Study and other actions tested
  16. A replicated, before-and-after study in 2010–2011 in two grassland sites in Utah, USA (Curtis et al. 2014) found that translocated Utah prairie dogs Cynomys parvidens released after the control of native predators into an area with artificial burrows showed low release site fidelity and different pre- and post-release behaviour. After translocation in both family groups and groups of unrelated individuals, prairie dogs spent more time being vigilant (48%) than they had done before translocation (22%). Only 50 out of 779 were still present at the release sites two months after release. In July 2010 and 2011, three hundred and seventy-nine and 400 prairie dogs were caught on a golf course using baited Tomahawk wire box-traps. Individuals were marked with hair dye and ear tags and released the same day at two sites with artificial burrow systems, with up to 10 animals/burrow. Each site had four release areas at least 200 m apart, each containing five burrows, 4 m apart. Each burrow consisted of a 30 × 45 × 30 cm box, buried 1.8m deep, and with two entrances (10-cm diameter and 4-m long) made from plastic tubing. Extra holes were left in the box and tubing to allow burrow expansion. Burrow entrances were protected from predators by mesh cages. At each site, two release areas were used for family groups and two were used for non-related groups. Predator removal of coyote Canis latrans and badgers Taxidea taxus was conducted for several weeks before and after prairie dog release. In September 2010 and 2011, prairie dogs were trapped, using 100 traps/site, during two sessions of four days each to determine site retention.

    Study and other actions tested
  17. A study in 2010–2013 at a grassland and woodland site in Western Australia, Australia (Ottewell et al. 2014) found that wild-born golden bandicoots Isoodon auratus, descended from a translocated population which had been released into a predator-free enclosure, maintained genetic diversity relative to the founder and source populations and persisted for three years. For four measures of genetic diversity (allelic richness, the number of effective alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity) there were no significant differences between descendants from translocated animals, founder animals that were translocated or source populations (see paper for details). The population size was estimated at 249 bandicoots in 2013. One hundred and sixty bandicoots were trapped on Barrow Island, which has a large population, in February 2010. They were released into a 1,100-ha enclosure free from introduced predators within 24 h of capture. Genetic material was sampled by ear punch biopsy from 57 founders in 2010 and from 67 wild-born progeny trapped in 2010–2012.

    Study and other actions tested
  18. A study in 2010–2014 in a woodland and shrubland site in Western Australia, Australia (Short & Hide 2015) found that following the control of invasive red foxes Vulpes vulpes and provision of nest boxes, a translocated population of red-tailed phascogales Phascogale calura survived for more than four years. Four years after the first release at least 16 phascogales were present at the site, and 90% of 30 nest boxes showed signs of use. In May 2010, twenty wild-caught phascogales were released into a 389-ha unfenced reserve, and a further 10 were released in May 2011. Poison baiting was used to control foxes on the reserve until 2012, but was suspended due to a possible positive effect on feral cats. In May 2014, phascogales were monitored using Elliott live traps (400 trap nights), and nest box checks.

    Study and other actions tested
  19. A replicated study in 2013 at a desert site in South Australia, Australia (Bannister et al. 2016) found that four translocated populations of burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur released after controlling invasive foxes Vulpes vulpes and cats Felis catus died out within four months. There was no significant difference in post-release survival for a large release (bettongs last recorded 42 days after the final release) and three smaller releases (bettongs persisted 41–53 days after releases). At the three smaller release areas, bettongs persisted for 53 days at the site where fewer predator tracks were recorded and for 2–10 days at two sites where more predator tracks were recorded. A total of 1,492 bettongs were translocated and released into rabbit warrens. At one 250-ha site, 1,266 bettongs were released in July–October 2013. In October– December 2013, five releases of 29–56 bettongs were made at three smaller sites, 4 km apart. From May–December 2003 feral cats Felis catus and foxes Vulpes vulpes were intensively controlled in a 500-km2 area by 428 hours of shooting patrols. Bettong survival was monitored using track counts, camera trapping, warren monitoring and live-trapping.

    Study and other actions tested
  20. A replicated study in 2005 in a grassland and forest site in Victoria, Australia (De Milliano et al. 2016) found that most captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii translocated into a fenced reserve where invasive predators had been eradicated survived more than 22 days after release. Nine out of 12 captive-bred bandicoots survived at least 22–26 days after release, when their radio transmitters fell off. Two individuals died within three weeks of release (one was predated by a native eastern quoll Dasyurus viverrinus and one was injured during trapping). The twelfth individual was returned to captivity after losing 21% of its body weight in 10 days. The nine bandicoots which survived had lost 7–19% of their body weight 6–8 days after release, but recovered to 97–98% of their pre-release weight by day 22–26. Twelve captive-bred bandicoots were released into a 170-ha fenced reserve, free of invasive predators. Six of the 12 were kept in a 1-ha pre-release pen for one week and provided with supplementary food and water. Bandicoots were radio-tracked daily, and were trapped and weighed every 4–5 days, for one month.

    Study and other actions tested
  21. A replicated, before-and-after study in 2011–2013 in two forest and grassland sites in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia (21) found that one to two years after release into predator-free fenced reserves, translocated eastern bettongs Bettongia gaimardi weighed more and had improved nutritional status. Translocated eastern bettongs weighed more (1.8 kg) one to two years after release than before they were released (1.7 kg). Various blood characteristics changed after release, suggesting that translocated bettongs had improved nutritional status (see original paper for details). Comprehensive health assessments were completed on 30 bettongs captured in Tasmania before release (July-October 2011 and April-September 2012) and 12–24 months after release (May–November 2013) into two predator-free reserves. In one reserve, bettongs (8 males, 10 females) received no supplementary food and the population was unmanaged. In the second reserve, bettongs (5 males, 7 females) were housed in small groups in 2.6–9.4-ha enclosures and provided supplementary food.

    Study and other actions tested
  22. A study in 2011–2014 in a semi-arid area in South Australia (22) found that over half of captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies Petrogale lateralis released into a large predator-free fenced area survived for at least two years and most females reproduced. Ten (five males, five females) of 16 rock-wallabies (63%) survived more than two years after being released. All five females that survived reproduced within 2–6 months of release. Over three years, 28 births from nine females were recorded. Between March 2011 and July 2012, sixteen captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies (eight males, eight females; 1–5 years old) were released in three groups into a 97-ha fenced area. Ten of the 16 rock-wallabies were wild-born and fostered by yellow-footed rock-wallaby Petrogale xanthopus surrogate mothers in captivity. Introduced predators, common wallaroos Macropus robustus and European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were removed from the enclosure. Supplementary water was provided in five 8-l tanks that were monitored with camera traps in 2011–2014. Rock-wallabies were fitted with radio-collars and tracked 1–7 times/week in 2011–2014. Trapping was carried out on seven occasions in 2011–2014.

    Study and other actions tested
Please cite as:

Littlewood, N.A., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K., Martin, P.A., Lockhart, S.L., Schoonover, R.F., Wilman, E., Bladon, A.J., Sainsbury, K.A., Pimm S. and Sutherland, W.J. (2020) Terrestrial Mammal Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions for terrestrial mammals excluding bats and primates. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

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Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

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Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Terrestrial Mammal Conservation - Published 2020

Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

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The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read latest volume: Volume 17

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Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust