Study

Changes in amphibian and reptile diversity over time in Parque Estadual do Utinga, Para State, Brazil, a protected area surrounded by urbanization

  • Published source details Avila-Pires T.C.S., Alves-Silva K.R., Barbosa L., Correa F.S., Cosenza J.F.A., Costa-Rodrigues A.P.V., Cronemberger A.A., Hoodgmoed M.S., Lima-Filho G.R., Maciel A.O., Missassi A.F.R., Nascimento L.R.S., Nunes A.L.S., Oliveira L.S., Palheta G.S., Pereira Jr A.J.S., Pinheiro L., Santos-Costa M.C., Pinho S.R.C., Silva F.M., Silva M.B. & Sturaro M.J. (2018) Changes in amphibian and reptile diversity over time in Parque Estadual do Utinga, Para State, Brazil, a protected area surrounded by urbanization. Herpetology Notes, 11, 499-512.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Protect habitat: All reptiles (excluding sea turtles)

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Protect habitat: All reptiles (excluding sea turtles)

    A before-and-after study in 2007–2015 in urban parkland with remnant forest in Pará state, Brazil (Avila-Pires et al. 2018) found that most lizard species and one of two amphisbaenian species recorded were still present 20 years after a park was protected. Twenty-two of 25 lizard species and one of two amphisbaenian species found in the park before 1985 were still present after 1990. Two lizard and two amphisbaenian species were recorded in the park after 1990 but not before 1985. A state park was protected from unsustainable resource use in 1993. The park (1,393 ha) included two lakes and remnant woodland and was an important recreational area for neighbouring urban areas. Reptiles were surveyed between March 2007 and January 2009 (81 total days of collecting and 48 days of pitfall trapping) and June 2014 and March 2015 (39 total days of collecting and pitfall trapping combined). Results were combined with herpetological collection records and historical survey data from 1990 onwards and compared with historical records and surveys undertaken before 1985.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

Output references
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