Study

Retention rate of hard-released translocated Egyptian tortoises Testudo kleinmanni

  • Published source details Attum O., Farag W.E., Baha El Din S.M. & Kingsbury B. (2010) Retention rate of hard-released translocated Egyptian tortoises Testudo kleinmanni. Endangered Species Research, 12, 11-15.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate adult or juvenile reptiles: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Translocate adult or juvenile reptiles: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A study in 2005–2007 in the Omayed Protectorate, Egypt (Attum et al. 2010) found that approximately a fifth of translocated Egyptian tortoises Testudo kleinmanni survived two years after being released. Two years after Egyptian tortoises were released, 21 of 109 tortoises were still alive. Eight tortoises were found dead during the two years after release. Dead tortoises had similar body mass to live tortoises (data presented as statistical model outputs). In September 2005, a total of 109 tortoises were released into a protected area (700 km2). The tortoises had been confiscated from illegal pet markets in May 2005 and were held in captivity for several months prior to release. Monitoring was carried out every 3 days (3–4 hours/day) in a 4 km area around the release site in May–October 2007 by searching for tortoises, following tracks and looking under vegetation.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

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