Study

Movement of translocated turtles according to translocation method and habitat structure

  • Published source details Attum O. & Cutshall C.D. (2015) Movement of translocated turtles according to translocation method and habitat structure. Restoration Ecology, 23, 588-594.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate adult or juvenile reptiles: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Translocate adult or juvenile reptiles: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A replicated, controlled study in 2010–2012 in a stream and a wetland complex in Kentucky, USA (Attum & Cutshall 2015) found that of three releases of translocated red-eared slider turtles Trachemys scripta elegans, one population of spring-released sliders moved more and further afield than autumn-released or resident turtles, but that another population of spring-released sliders did not move more than resident turtles. Red-eared sliders released in spring into a stream moved more (total distance travelled: 8.6 km) and further away from the point of release (average distance from release: 1.4 km) than sliders released in autumn (total distance travelled: 3.8 km; average distance from release: 0.6 km) or resident sliders (total distance travelled: 4.6 km; average distance from release: 0.6 km). In a second translocation to a wetland complex, spring-released sliders had similar sized home ranges (6.3 ha) and travelled similar distances in total (4.5 km) compared to resident turtles (home range: 6.0 ha; total distance travelled: 3.8 km). Twenty-three sliders were translocated into a stream after hibernation in spring (March–May 2011 and 2012; 12 individuals) and before hibernation in autumn (October 2011, 11 individuals) from 20 km away and monitored in March 2011–October 2012 alongside 11 resident sliders (captured in May–October 2011). A further 13 sliders (captured May–August 2010) were translocated to a wetland complex and monitored alongside 13 resident sliders (captured April–June 2010) in May 2010–June 2011. All turtles were radio-tracked twice weekly in the activity season and once a month during hibernation.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

Output references
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