Study

Ecological husbandry and reproduction of Madagascar spider (Pyxis arachnoides) and flat-tailed (Pyxis planicauda) tortoises

  • Published source details Pearson D.W. (2013) Ecological husbandry and reproduction of Madagascar spider (Pyxis arachnoides) and flat-tailed (Pyxis planicauda) tortoises. Chelonian Research Monographs, 6, 146-152.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Breed reptiles in captivity: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Breed reptiles in captivity: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A study in 2002–2009 in Florida, USA (Pearson 2013) found that when seasonal variation in temperature and humidity were recreated during incubation of captive Madagascar spider tortoises Pyxis arachnoides and flat-tailed tortoises Pyxis planicauda eggs, more than half of eggs hatched successfully. In 2002–2009, twenty-six of 50 (52%) spider tortoise eggs and 10 of 10 (100%) flat-tailed tortoise eggs hatched successfully. Of the spider tortoise eggs that failed to hatch, 71% were infertile. There was a large difference between the total incubation period (spider tortoises: 192–303 days; flat-tailed tortoise: 213–275 days) and the length of the incubation period after eggs began to develop (spider tortoises: 82–126 days; flat-tailed tortoise: 73–97 days; see paper for details). Tortoises were acquired in 2002 (numbers not given). Eggs were incubated at 31°C during the day and 26°C at night in vermiculite (1:1 ratio with water) for 8–12 weeks. Eggs were then removed from the incubator and kept at room temperature (20–24°C) for 6–8 weeks, and the vermiculite substrate was left to gradually dry out. Eggs were then returned to the warmer incubation conditions until hatching.

    (Summarised by: William Morgan)

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