Study

Establishment of Carex stricta Lam. seedlings in experimental wetlands with implications for restoration

  • Published source details Budelsky R.A. & Galatowitsch S.M. (2004) Establishment of Carex stricta Lam. seedlings in experimental wetlands with implications for restoration. Plant Ecology (formerly Vegetatio 1948-1996), 175, 91-105.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Remove vegetation that could compete with planted non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Actively manage water level before/after planting non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Remove vegetation that could compete with planted non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, paired, controlled study in 1995–1997 in three recently excavated wet basins in Minnesota, USA (Budelsky & Galatowitsch 2004) found that weeding to remove competitors had no significant effect on the height of planted tussock sedge Carex stricta, and that effect on sedge survival depended on other factors. In each of three years, the height of planted sedges was statistically similar in weeded and unweeded plots (data not reported). Weeding had no significant effect on sedge survival in the first and third years after planting. In the second year, weeding increased planted sedge survival at high elevations (weeded: 100%; unweeded: 57%) but reduced sedge survival at low elevations (weeded: 38%; unweeded: 96%). The study also reported data on biomass/plant and shoot number/plant. The effect of weeding on these metrics depended on time since planting, elevation and/or water regime (see original paper). Methods: Forty-eight 5-m2 plots were established, in 12 sets of four, across three wet basins (same as in Study 1). In May 1995, nursery-reared tussock sedge was planted into each bare plot (10 or 45 plants/plot). Twenty-four plots (2 plots/set) were weeded (colonizing plants removed) throughout the study. The plots were situated at four different elevations, and each basin had a different water regime (falling, stable or rising through each growing season). Vegetation was surveyed through the 1995, 1996 and 1997 growing seasons.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Actively manage water level before/after planting non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

    A controlled, before-and-after study in 1995–1997 in three recently excavated wet basins in Minnesota, USA (Budelsky & Galatowitsch 2004) found that simulating a naturally falling water level had no significant effect on the height of planted tussock sedge Carex stricta, and that effect on sedge survival depended on other factors. In each of three years, the height of planted sedges was statistically similar under a falling, rising or stable water regime (data not reported). Sedge survival was significantly affected by water regime in the first and second years after planting (but not the third), but the effect depended on plot elevation. For example, first-year survival was >98% under all water regimes in higher/drier plots, but ranged from 47% (falling regime) to 96% (rising regime) in lower/wetter plots. The study also reported data on biomass/plant and shoot number/plant. The effect of water regime on these metrics depended on time since planting, elevation and/or weeding (see original paper). Methods: The study used three wet basins (same as in Study 2), each of which was managed with a different water regime: falling, stable or rising throughout the growing season. The falling regime was most similar to natural conditions in local depressional wetlands (deepest flooding at start of growing season). In May 1995, nursery-reared tussock sedge was planted into 48 bare, 5-m2 plots (16 plots/basin; 10 or 45 plants/plot). The plots were situated at four different elevations, and half of the plots in each basin were weeded (colonizing plants removed) throughout the study. Vegetation was surveyed through the 1995, 1996 and 1997 growing seasons.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  3. Directly plant non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated study in 1995–1997 in three recently excavated wet basins in Minnesota, USA (Budelsky & Galatowitsch 2004) reported >48% survival of planted tussock sedge Carex stricta in each of the three years after planting, and increases in sedge biomass and stem number over time. In the first growing season after planting, the sedge survival rate ranged from 48% in the wettest plots to 99% in the driest. In the next two growing seasons, the survival rates in all plots were ≥90%. Amongst variation related to water regime, elevation and weeding treatments (see original paper), there were significant increases over time in sedge biomass (from 2–16 g/plant after one growing season to 49–234 g/plant after three growing seasons) and stem number (from <5 stems/plant when planted to 50–310 stems/plant after three growing seasons). Methods: In May 1995, nursery-reared tussock sedge was planted into 48 bare, 5-m2 plots (10 or 45 plants/plot) across three wet basins (same as in Study 8). Each basin was managed with a different water regime: falling, stable or rising throughout the growing season. The plots were situated at four different elevations, and half were weeded (colonizing plants removed) throughout the study. Vegetation was surveyed through the 1995, 1996 and 1997 growing seasons.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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