Study

The overlooked role of biotic factors in controlling the ecological performance of artificial marine habitats

  • Published source details Ferrario F., Iveša L., Jaklin A., Perkol-Finkel S. & Airoldi L. (2016) The overlooked role of biotic factors in controlling the ecological performance of artificial marine habitats. Journal of Applied Ecology, 53, 16-24.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Transplant or seed organisms onto subtidal artificial structures

Action Link
Biodiversity of Marine Artificial Structures

Transplant or seed organisms onto subtidal artificial structures

Action Link
Biodiversity of Marine Artificial Structures

Transplant or seed organisms onto subtidal artificial structures

Action Link
Biodiversity of Marine Artificial Structures
  1. Transplant or seed organisms onto subtidal artificial structures

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2010 on a subtidal breakwater on open coastline in the Adriatic Sea, Italy (Ferrario et al. 2016a) reported that canopy algae Cystoseira barbata transplanted onto the breakwater under cages grew, but decreased in length when left uncaged. Over 13 days, canopy algae transplant growth was similar under large-mesh cages (131% of original length) and small-mesh cages (115%), but uncaged transplants decreased in length (18% of original length). Boulders with attached juvenile canopy algae were collected from natural reefs, fragmented and attached to limestone plates (100 × 100 mm) using epoxy putty, then transplanted onto a boulder breakwater. Fifteen plates with 5–6 individuals/plate were attached to horizontal surfaces on the wave-sheltered side of a breakwater on sandy shoreline in July 2010 (depth not reported). Five randomly-selected plates were protected from grazers by large-mesh plastic-coated wire cages (10 mm mesh size), five by small-mesh cages (1 mm) and five were left uncaged. Transplants were monitored over 13 days. Three caged plates were missing and no longer retained transplants on the breakwater.

    (Summarised by: Ally Evans)

  2. Transplant or seed organisms onto subtidal artificial structures

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2010 on three subtidal breakwaters on open coastline in the Adriatic Sea, Italy (Ferrario et al. 2016b) reported that 67–100% of canopy algae Cystoseira barbata transplanted onto the breakwaters survived, depending on the presence and mesh-size of cages around them. After 15 days, canopy algae transplant survival was higher under small-mesh cages (100%) than large-mesh cages (75%) and for uncaged transplants (67%), which were similar. Boulders with attached juvenile canopy algae were collected from natural reefs, fragmented and attached to limestone plates (100 × 100 mm) using epoxy putty, then transplanted onto boulder breakwaters. Fifteen plates with 5–6 individuals/plate were attached to horizontal surfaces on the wave-sheltered side of each of three breakwaters on sandy shorelines in August 2010 (depth not reported). On each breakwater, five randomly-selected plates were protected from grazers by large-mesh plastic-coated wire cages (10 mm mesh size with 60 × 70 mm openings), five by small-mesh cages (1 mm) and five were left uncaged. Transplants were monitored over 15 days. Four caged plates were missing and no longer retained transplants on the breakwater.

    (Summarised by: Ally Evans)

  3. Transplant or seed organisms onto subtidal artificial structures

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2010–2011 on three subtidal breakwaters on open coastline in the Adriatic Sea, Croatia (Ferrario et al. 2016c) reported that the cover of canopy algae transplanted onto breakwaters under cages increased, but decreased when left uncaged, and found that cover of caged transplants was higher than uncaged transplants. After 12 months, canopy algae transplant cover was higher under cages than when left uncaged for both Cystoseira barbata (caged: 72%; uncaged: 8%) and Cystoseira compressa (caged: 79%; uncaged: 13%) canopy algae. Cover increased by 7–31% under cages, but decreased by 40–55% when left uncaged. Limestone settlement plates (100 × 100 mm) were attached to rocky seabed at 3–4 m depth in May 2010 and were colonized by two species of juvenile canopy algae (40–70% cover). In October 2010, plates were removed and transplanted onto boulder breakwaters using epoxy putty. Eight plates of each species were attached to horizontal surfaces on the wave-sheltered side of each of three breakwaters on rocky shorelines (depth not reported). On each breakwater, four randomly-selected plates of each species were protected from grazers by plastic-coated wire cages (10 mm mesh size) and four were left uncaged. Transplants were monitored from photographs over 12 months.

    (Summarised by: Ally Evans)

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