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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Impact of conservation management activities on a population of scarlet macaws Ara macao in the Central Pacific Conservation Area of western Costa Rica

Published source details

Vaughan C., Nemeth N.M., Cary J. & Temple S. (2005) Response of a scarlet macaw Ara macao population to conservation practices in Costa Rica. Bird Conservation International, 15, 119-130


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Increase ‘on-the-ground’ protection to reduce unsustainable levels of exploitation Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in western Costa Rica (Vaughan et al. 2005) found an increase in a scarlet macaw Ara macao population from 185-225 individuals in 1990-4 to 225-265 in 1997-2003, following an increase in anti-poaching patrols and the confiscation of ladders and tree-climbing equipment (used to remove nestlings from nests) and several other interventions (see ‘Use education programmes and local engagement to reduce pressures on species’, ‘Promote sustainable alternative livelihoods based on species’, ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’ and ‘Guard nests to increase nest success’). In 1990-4 the population had been showing a 4%/year decline. In addition, following the start of intensive anti-poaching activities, the young-to-adult ratio (which is related to recruitment rate) was 9% in 1995-6 (compared to an average of 6% for 1990-2003). However, the intensity of the anti-poaching effort could not be maintained and when it was reduced the ratio fell back to 6%.

 

Promote sustainable alternative livelihoods Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in western Costa Rica (Vaughan et al. 2005) found an increase in a scarlet macaw Ara macao population from 185-225 individuals in 1990-4 to 225-265 in 1997-2003, following the promotion of economic incentives relating to macaws and several other interventions (‘Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce persecution or exploitation of species’, ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’ and ‘Guard nests to increase nest success’). In 1990-4 the population had been showing a 4%/year decline. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Increase ‘on-the-ground’ protection to reduce unsustainable levels of exploitation’.

 

Guard nests to increase nest success Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in western Costa Rica (Vaughan et al. 2005) found an increase in a scarlet macaw Ara macau population from 185-225 individuals in 1990-4 to 225-265 in 1997-2003, following the protection of artificial and natural nesting cavities and several other interventions (see ‘Use education programmes and local engagement to reduce pressures on species’, ‘Promote sustainable alternative livelihoods based on species’, and ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’). In 1990-4 the population had been showing a 4%/year decline. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Increase ‘on-the-ground’ protection to reduce unsustainable levels of exploitation’.

 

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for parrots Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in western Costa Rica (Vaughan et al. 2005) found an increase in a scarlet macaw Ara macau population from 185-225 individuals in 1990-4 to 225-265 in 1997-2003, following the provision of artificial nests and several other interventions (see ‘Use education programmes and local engagement to reduce pressures on species’, ‘Promote sustainable alternative livelihoods based on species’, and ‘Guard nests to increase nest success’). In 1990-4 the population had been showing a 4%/year decline. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Increase ‘on-the-ground’ protection to reduce unsustainable levels of exploitation’.

 

Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce persecution or exploitation of species Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in western Costa Rica (Vaughan et al. 2005) found an increase in a scarlet macaw Ara macao population from 185-225 individuals in 1990-4 to 225-265 in 1997-2003, following the formation of a local conservation organisation; environmental education programmes; meetings with local stakeholders and several other interventions (‘Promote sustainable alternative livelihoods based on species’, ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’ and ‘Guard nests to increase nest success’). In 1990-4 the population had been showing a 4%/year decline. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Increase ‘on-the-ground’ protection to reduce unsustainable levels of exploitation’.