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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Failure of translocated, captive-bred North Island weka Gallirallus australis greyi to establish at Karangahake Gorge, Waikato, New Zealand

Published source details

Bramley G.N. & Veltman C.J. (1998) Failure of translocated, captive-bred North Island weka Gallirallus australis greyi to establish a new population. Bird Conservation International, 8, 195-204


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of rails Bird Conservation

A replicated study on North Island, New Zealand, in 1992-3 (Bramley & Veltman 1998) found that, of 17 North Island weka Gallirallus australis greyi released between October and March at a mixed habitat site, only one bird was alive more than seven months after release. Most individuals were killed by predators (mainly by domestic dogs Canis familiaris) and 12 individuals (71%) survived less than 50 days. Weka had small home ranges (average of 2.7 ha) and dispersed an average of only 1.3 km during the study.