Study

Direct seeding of Brazilian savanna trees: effects of plant cover and fertilization on seedling establishment and growth

  • Published source details Silva R.R., Oliveira D.R., da Rocha G.P. & Vieira D.L. (2015) Direct seeding of Brazilian savanna trees: effects of plant cover and fertilization on seedling establishment and growth. Restoration Ecology, 23, 393-401.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Sow seeds of tree species in savanna

Action Link
Grassland Conservation

Add fertilizer to soil before or after seeding/planting

Action Link
Grassland Conservation
  1. Sow seeds of tree species in savanna

    A replicated study in 2010–2012 in an arable field in Brazil (Silva et al. 2015) found that over half of tree seeds sown germinated but fewer than half of seeds resulted in trees which survived for more than two years. After 42 days, 3,200 of the 6,180 tree seeds sown had germinated. After 780 days, 2,144 seedlings of the 3,200 that had germinated were alive. In November 2010, tree seeds of six species were sown in rows one metre apart resulting in 6,180 sown seeds. Seedling germination and survival was recorded for each plant after 42, 84, 126, 217, 398 and 780 days. This experiment was also part of a study testing the effect of fertilizer and plant cover on seedling germination and growth.

    (Summarised by: Philip Martin)

  2. Add fertilizer to soil before or after seeding/planting

    A replicated, controlled, paired study in 2010–2012 in an arable field in Brazil (Silva et al. 2015) found that adding fertilizer and sowing tree seeds did not increase seedling survival compared to sowing without fertilizer. After 780 days, survival did not differ significantly for seedlings where fertilizer had been added (13–35%) and seedlings where it had not been added (27–52%). In November 2010, soil was ploughed in eight 1-m wide rows. In four of these rows, 30 seeds of six tree species were sown and 253 g of fertilizer and 84 g of phosphate/m were added. In the four other rows, seeds were sown but no fertilizer was applied. Holes were then refilled with soil and a straw mulch was spread. Seedling germination and survival was recorded for each plant after 42, 84, 126, 217, 398, and 780 days.

    (Summarised by: Philip Martin)

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