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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Impact of poison application method on survival of South Island New Zealand robins Petroica australis australis during predator control operations in Nothofagus forest near Maruia, West Coast, New Zealand

Published source details

Brown K.P. (1997) Impact of brodifacoum poisoning operations on South Island robins Petroica australis australis in a New Zealand Nothofagus forest. Bird Conservation International, 7, 399-407


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Distribute poison bait for predator control using dispensers Bird Conservation

A controlled study in three southern beech Nothofagus stands on South Island, New Zealand between August and November 1996 (Brown 1997) found that survival of South Island robins Petroica australis australis during predator removal operations was higher when brodifacoum was dispensed from bait feeders than in a site where 3 kg/ha poison was scattered and left exposed on the forest floor (29/30 birds surviving, 97% vs. 12/23 birds surviving, 52%). Survival in a control site, with no poisoning, was higher than in the broadcast site but not significantly different from the bait feeder site (18/21 birds surviving, 86%). Feeders were designed to allow black rats Rattus rattus and house mice Mus musculus to enter and retrieve baits, but not brush-tailed possums Trichosurus vulpecula.

Control predators not on islands for songbirds Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in three southern beech Nothofagus stands on South Island, New Zealand between August and November 1996 (Brown 1997) found that survival of South Island robins Petroica australis australis was not significantly higher when brodifacoum bait was dispensed from bait feeders (29/30 birds surviving, 97%) than in a control site (18/21, 86%), but was significantly lower when the bait was broadcast (12/23, 52%). This study is described in ‘Distribute poison bait using dispensers’.