Study

A comparative study of macrophyte species richness in differently managed shore stretches of Lake Peipsi

  • Published source details Palmik K., Mäemets H., Haldna M. & Kangur K. (2013) A comparative study of macrophyte species richness in differently managed shore stretches of Lake Peipsi. Limnologica, 43, 245-253.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Cut/mow herbaceous plants to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Cut/mow herbaceous plants to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

    A replicated, site comparison study in 2009–2010 of a lakeshore marsh in Estonia (Palmik et al. 2013) reported that mown areas had higher plant species richness than unmown areas. Statistical significance was not assessed. Vegetation was surveyed in July/August, in the band of intermittently flooded wetland vegetation around the lake. There were 12.3 plant species/0.25 m2 in areas mown earlier that summer vs 5.9 plant species/0.25 m2 in areas not yet mown that summer. Methods: In July/August 2009 and 2010, plant species were recorded in 0.25-m2 quadrats, along nine transects on the edge of Lake Peipsi. This summary focuses on quadrats (number not clear) in the intermittently flooded zone between open water and upland terraces. The lakeshore had been reprofiled and cleared of undesirable tall vegetation (mostly common reed Phragmites austalis and willows Salix spp.) 1–17 years previously, and regularly mowed (in summer) since.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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