Study

Blocking Phragmites australis reinvasion of restored marshes using plants selected from wild populations and tissue culture

  • Published source details Wang J., Seliskar D.M., Gallagher J.L. & League M.T. (2006) Blocking Phragmites australis reinvasion of restored marshes using plants selected from wild populations and tissue culture. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 14, 539-547

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant non-woody plants: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

    A replicated, paired, controlled study in 2000–2004 in a degraded brackish marsh in New Jersey, USA (Wang et al. 2006) reported 38–100% survival of three planted shrub species over two years, and that survivors grew in six of seven cases. Statistical significance was not assessed. Survival rates were 38–73% for southern wax myrtle Myrica cerifera, 92–100% for sea myrtle Baccharis halimifolia and 100% for Jesuit’s bark Iva frutescens. In six of seven cases, surviving plants grew in height (8–252% increase) and circumference (9–233% increase). In the other case, southern wax myrtle grew in height by <1% and shrunk in circumference by 3%. The study also reported that areas planted with the herbs (and some shrubs) contained fewer common reed stems (7–25 stems/m2) than adjacent unplanted areas (66–149 stems/m2). Methods: In summer–autumn 2000–2002, three shrub and five herb species were planted in three areas on the edge of a marsh (4–7 species/area; 4–48 plants/species/area; individual plants 60–100 cm apart). All planted shrubs had been collected from local marshes. Invasive common reed Phragmites australis had been cleared <1 year before planting, by applying herbicide and cutting. Plant survival and size were recorded 1–2 years after planting. Common reed stems were counted in the planted areas and three adjacent unplanted areas, 2–4 years after reed clearance.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Directly plant non-woody plants: brackish/saline wetlands

    A replicated, paired, controlled study in 2000–2004 in a degraded brackish marsh in New Jersey, USA (Wang et al. 2006) reported 67–100% survival of five planted herb species over two years, and that survivors grew in 8 of 10 cases. Statistical significance was not assessed. Survival rates were lowest for saltmarsh rush Juncus gerardii and saltmarsh bulrush Scirpus robustus (67% or 100% across two cases) and highest for black rush Juncus roemerianus (100% in two of two cases). In 8 of 10 cases, surviving plants grew in height (4–241% increase) and circumference (21–251% increase) over the second year after planting. In the other two cases, plant circumference decreased by 16–78% and height changed by ≤15%. The study also reported that areas planted with the herbs (and some shrubs) contained fewer common reed stems (7–25 stems/m2) than adjacent unplanted areas (66–149 stems/m2). Methods: In summer–autumn 2000–2002, five herb and three shrub species were planted in three areas on the edge of a marsh (4–7 species/area; 4–48 plants/species/area; individual plants 60–100 cm apart). Plants were collected from the wild or grown from tissue in a laboratory. Invasive common reed Phragmites australis had been cleared <1 year before planting, by applying herbicide and cutting. Plant survival and size were recorded 1–2 years after planting. Common reed stems were counted in the planted areas and three adjacent unplanted areas, 2–4 years after reed clearance.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references

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