Study

Reasons for reforestation success and failure with three mangrove species in Colombia

  • Published source details Elster C. (2000) Reasons for reforestation success and failure with three mangrove species in Colombia. Forest Ecology and Management, 131, 201-214

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Introduce tree/shrub seeds or propagules: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

    A replicated study in 1995–1997 in two degraded mangroves in Colombia (Elster 2000) reported that 0–100% of planted trees survived over 15 months – depending on species, age and environmental conditions – but that survivors grew. For example, white mangrove Laguncularia racemosa seedlings had significantly higher survival rates (0–90%) than black mangrove Avicennia germinans seedlings (0–11%). For these species, seedlings had lower survival rates (0–90%) than saplings (20–100%; statistical significance not assessed). Surviving plants grew over 13 months (see original paper). The study suggests that variation in survival and growth was related to dust, winds, soil moisture, soil firmness and/or caterpillar damage. Methods: In 1995 (start of the dry season), seedlings and/or saplings of three mangrove species were planted into two degraded mangrove sites. In both sites, channels had been unblocked (in 1989 or earlier in 1995) to restore freshwater inputs and reduce the salinity that killed the existing mangrove trees (around 1965 or 1975). Sets of 10–30 trees were planted in a range of soil conditions (1–2 sets/species/site; see original paper for full details). Survival and plant height were monitored at planting and for up to 15 months.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Introduce tree/shrub seeds or propagules: brackish/saline wetlands

    A replicated study in 1995–1997 in a degraded mangrove forest in Colombia (Elster 2000) reported that 0–100% of planted propagules survived over 15 months, depending on species and environmental conditions, but that survivors grew. When planted and secured in flooded soils, survival rates were 71% for red mangrove Rhizophora mangle, 28% for white mangrove Laguncularia racemosa and 10% for black mangrove Avicennia germinans. Caterpillars ate most of the black mangroves. When planted into saturated soils, only red mangroves survived (100%). When planted into dry soils, no species survived for longer than 10 months. Surviving plants grew by 20–110 cm over 13 months. Methods: In November–December 1995 (start of the dry season), field-collected propagules were planted into a former mangrove site. The site had been reconnected to the main lagoon system (in 1989) to reduce the salinity that killed the former mangroves (around 1965). Sets of 15–100 propagules were planted (1–3 sets/species) in a range of soil conditions: flooded (5–10 cm deep), saturated (water table at soil surface) or dry (water table 2 cm below surface). After planting, water depths varied seasonally. Shade was provided for some propagules. Survival and plant height were monitored for up to 15 months.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references

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