Study

An assessment of lessons learnt from the “Green Coast Project” in Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam (NAD) Province and Nias Island, Indonesia (Period 2005–2008)

  • Published source details International Wetlands (2008) An assessment of lessons learnt from the “Green Coast Project” in Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam (NAD) Province and Nias Island, Indonesia (Period 2005–2008). Wetlands International report.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Introduce tree/shrub seeds or propagules: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Introduce tree/shrub seeds or propagules: brackish/saline wetlands

    A replicated study in 2006–2009 of 47 mangrove restoration projects in Sumatra, Indonesia (Wibisono & Sualia 2008) reported 0–99% survival of planted propagules/seedlings after <15 months. Some planted individuals survived in 45 of the 47 projects. Survival rates ranged from 17% to 99% per project. The study suggests that survival was influenced by factors such as elevation, sediment deposition, flash floods, grazing by crabs, smothering by algae, soaking propagules before planting, and prior planting experience of communities (effects not quantified). Methods: Between February 2006 and September 2008, approximately 1.6 million mangrove seedlings and/or propagules were planted across 47 projects (mostly in separate sites). The study does not distinguish between the effects of planting propagules and seedlings. Eight species were planted (mostly Rhizophora spp.) on mudflats, in degraded mangroves, in former aquaculture ponds, and along water channels. Individuals were generally planted 0.3–1.0 m apart, but sometimes with double plantings at a single point. At some time within 15 months of planting (not clearly reported), survival rates were checked for 20% of the planted individuals in each project.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

    A replicated study in 2006–2009 of 47 mangrove restoration projects in Sumatra, Indonesia (Wibisono & Sualia 2008) reported 0–99% survival of planted seedlings/propagules after <15 months. Some planted individuals survived in 45 of the 47 projects. Survival rates ranged from 17% to 99% per project. The study suggests that survival was influenced by factors such as elevation, sediment deposition, flash floods, grazing by crabs, smothering by algae, soaking propagules before planting, and prior planting experience of communities (effects not quantified). Methods: Between February 2006 and September 2008, approximately 1.6 million mangrove seedlings and/or propagules were planted across 47 projects (mostly in separate sites). The study does not distinguish between the effects of planting seedlings and propagules. Eight species were planted (mostly Rhizophora spp.) on mudflats, in degraded mangroves, in former aquaculture ponds, and along water channels. Individuals were generally planted 0.3–1.0 m apart, but sometimes with double plantings at a single point. At some time within 15 months of planting (not clearly reported), survival rates were checked for 20% of the planted individuals in each project.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references

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