Study

An example of management by removal of vegetation: lac des Aurèdes (Var, France)

  • Published source details Félisiak D., Duborper E. & Yavercovski N. (2004) An example of management by removal of vegetation: lac des Aurèdes (Var, France). Pages 84 in: P. Grillas, P. Gauthier, N. Yavercovski & C. Perennou (eds.) Mediterranean Temporary Pools Volume 1 – Issues Relating to Conservation, Functioning and Management. Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Arles.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Physically remove problematic plants: freshwater marshes

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Cut/mow herbaceous plants to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Physically remove problematic plants: freshwater marshes

    A controlled, before-and-after study in 2001–2003 in an ephemeral freshwater wetland dominated by compact rush Juncus conglomeratus in southern France (Félisiak et al. 2004) reported that removing the vegetation increased the number of plant species characteristic of Mediterranean temporary marshes over the following two years. Statistical significance was not assessed. The number of characteristic plant species increased in stripped plots, from zero in the year before intervention to 3–4 in the two years after (units not reported). The number of characteristic plant species was relatively stable in unmanaged plots (before: 2–4; after: 3–6). Methods: Four plots were established in rush-dominated vegetation near a reservoir. In autumn 2001, one plot was stripped of vegetation (including the root mat), exposing bare soil. The other three plots were left undisturbed. Plant species were recorded in the year before intervention (2001) and for two years after (2002 and 2003).An example of management by removal 

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Cut/mow herbaceous plants to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

    A replicated, paired, controlled, before-and-after study in 2001–2003 in an ephemeral freshwater wetland dominated by tall herbs in southern France (Félisiak et al. 2004) reported that cutting the vegetation increased the number of plant species characteristic of Mediterranean temporary marshes. Statistical significance was not assessed. The number of characteristic plant species increased in cut plots, from 2–3 in the year before intervention to 6–12 in the two years after (units not reported). The number of characteristic plant species was relatively stable in unmanaged plots (before: 2–4; after: 3–6). Methods: Six pairs of plots were established near a reservoir, in an ephemerally flooded wetland where historical grazing had ceased. The plots were dominated by compact rush Juncus conglomeratus or bulrush Scirpus holoschoenus. In autumn 2001 and 2002, the vegetation was cut in one plot/pair. Cuttings were removed. Plant species were recorded in the year before intervention (2001) and for two years after (2002 and 2003).

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references

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