Study

Cootes Paradise Marsh: community participation in the restoration of a Great Lakes coastal wetland

  • Published source details Chow-Fraser P. & Lukasik L. (1995) Cootes Paradise Marsh: community participation in the restoration of a Great Lakes coastal wetland. Restoration & Management Notes, 13, 183-189.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use fences or barriers to protect freshwater wetlands planted with non-woody plants

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Use fences or barriers to protect freshwater wetlands planted with non-woody plants

    A replicated, paired, controlled study in 1993–1994 in a freshwater marsh in Ontario, Canada (Chow-Fraser & Lukasik 1995) reported that silt screens increased survival of emergent vegetation one year after planting. Statistical significance was not assessed. In deep water (>40 cm at planting), 100% of planted arrowheads Sagittaria latifolia survived in a plot surrounded by a silt screen (vs 0% in a plot without a silt screen). In shallow water (15 cm at planting), the survival rate of planted broadleaf cattails Typha latifolia was more than twice as high in a screened plot than an unscreened plot (precise data not reported). Methods: In August 1993, two pairs of plots (one shallow-water, one deep-water) were established in Cootes Paradise Marsh. Each 6-m2 plot was planted with 90 plants: 30 arrowhead, 30 cattails and 30 submerged plants. All plots were fenced to exclude muskrats Ondatra zibethicus. Two plots (one plot/pair) were also surrounded by a finer-mesh silt screen. Vegetation was surveyed in August 1994. The study does not report full results from all plots.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Directly plant non-woody plants: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated study in 1993–1994 in a freshwater marsh in Ontario, Canada (Chow-Fraser & Lukasik 1995) reported 0–100% survival of planted emergent herbs, depending on water depth and use of silt screens. Vegetation was surveyed approximately one year after planting. Across three plots in shallow water (15–20 cm at planting), approximately 24% of arrowheads Sagittaria latifolia and 10% of broadleaf cattails Typha latifolia survived. Cattail survival was also reported, but not quantified, in two other shallow-water plots. In seven of eight plots in deep water (≥30 cm at planting), no arrowheads survived. In the other plot, surrounded by a fine-mesh silt screen, all planted arrowheads had survived and spread. Methods: In August 1993, volunteers planted 90 plants into each of thirteen 6-m2 plots in Cootes Paradise Marsh: 30 arrowhead, 30 cattails and 30 submerged plants. All plots were fenced in an attempt to exclude muskrats Ondatra zibethicus, but they entered at least eight plots and ate the above-ground vegetation. Vegetation was surveyed in July and August 1994.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust