Study

Effects of temperature, stratification, scarification, and seed origin on the germination of Scirpus acutus Muhl. seeds for use in constructed wetlands

  • Published source details Thullen J.S. & Eberts D.R. (1995) Effects of temperature, stratification, scarification, and seed origin on the germination of Scirpus acutus Muhl. seeds for use in constructed wetlands. Wetlands, 15, 298-304

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Chill seeds of non-woody plants before sowing: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Physically damage seeds of non-woody plants before sowing: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Chill seeds of non-woody plants before sowing: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, controlled study in the early 1990s in a laboratory in Colorado, USA (Thullen & Eberts 1995) found that chilling hardstem bulrush Scirpus acutus seeds increased their germination rate. In all five of five comparisons, germination rates were higher for seeds that had been chilled before incubation (reaching 32–88% after 12 weeks) than for seeds that had not been chilled (reaching 0–7% after 12 weeks). Longer chilling periods typically increased germination rates (seven of nine comparisons; other two comparisons no significant effect; see original paper for data). Methods: Ninety-six sets of 10–50 hardstem bulrush seeds were incubated in flasks of water at 10/25°C or 18/22°C (night/day temperatures). Of these, 80 sets had been chilled in water (4°C; for 2–12 weeks) before incubation. The remaining 16 sets did not receive this chilling treatment. All seeds had been collected in August 1991 from two wild populations, stored in the laboratory for >5 months, and sterilized immediately before the experiment. Seed germination was monitored weekly during 12 weeks of incubation.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Physically damage seeds of non-woody plants before sowing: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, controlled study in the early 1990s in a laboratory in Colorado, USA (Thullen & Eberts 1995) found that rubbing hardstem bulrush Scirpus acutus seeds with sandpaper had no significant effect on their germination rate. Germination rates did not significantly differ between seeds that had been rubbed between sandpaper before incubation (0–11% germination) and seeds that had not been rubbed (0–14% germination). Methods: Thirty-two sets of 10–50 hardstem bulrush seeds were incubated in flasks of fresh water at 10/25°C or 18/22°C (night/day temperatures). Of these, 16 sets had been rubbed 20 times with sandpaper immediately before incubation, whilst 16 sets had not. All seeds had been collected in August 1991 from two wild populations, stored in the laboratory for >5 months, and sterilized immediately before the experiment. The study does not clearly report the length of monitoring (probably between six and twelve weeks).

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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