Study

A review of mangrove rehabilitation in the Philippines: successes, failures and future prospects

  • Published source details Primavera J.H. & Esteban J.M.A. (2008) A review of mangrove rehabilitation in the Philippines: successes, failures and future prospects. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 16, 345-358.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

    A study in 2006–2008 in the Philippines (Primavera & Esteban 2008) reported approximately 50% survival of planted grey mangrove Avicennia marina seedlings after six months, but <10% survival after 18 months. The study suggests mortality was mainly due to frequent tidal flooding, with most surviving plants located at the highest elevations. Other contributing factors were garbage, trampling by fishers, and people digging in the sediment. Methods: In 2006, >400 nursery-reared grey mangrove seedlings were planted at various elevations along the banks of the Iloilo River (further details not reported). Survival was monitored over 18 months.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Directly plant trees/shrubs: brackish/saline wetlands

    A study in 2006 in the Philippines (Primavera & Esteban 2008) reported that all planted mangrove seedlings died within three months. The study suggests mortality was mainly due to prolonged flooding, evidenced by rotting stems. Seedlings were also damaged by barnacles, algae and sediment deposition. Methods: Approximately 20,000 mangrove seedlings were planted in the lower intertidal to subtidal zone of a coastal site at Dumangas. The seedlings were mostly (90%) nursery-reared grey mangrove Avicennia marina. The other 10% included mangrove apple Sonneratia alba and Rhizophora spp. Survival was monitored over three months.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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