Study

Growth and survival of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum[L.] Rich.) planted across a flooding gradient in a Louisiana bottomland forest

  • Published source details Conner W.H. & Flynn K. (1989) Growth and survival of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum[L.] Rich.) planted across a flooding gradient in a Louisiana bottomland forest. Wetlands, 9, 207-217

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use fences or barriers to protect freshwater wetlands planted with trees/shrubs

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Directly plant trees/shrubs: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Use fences or barriers to protect freshwater wetlands planted with trees/shrubs

    A replicated, paired, controlled study in 1985–1987 in a floodplain swamp in Louisiana, USA (Conner & Flynn 1989) reported that using chickenwire fencing to exclude herbivores increased survival of baldcypress Taxodium distichum seedlings planted in spring, but had no clear effect on survival of seedlings planted in autumn. Statistical significance was not assessed. For seedlings planted in spring, those surrounded by fencing had an 81–91% survival rate after one growing season and a 40–70% survival rate after three growing seasons. Unfenced spring-planted seedlings were all eaten within the first growing season. For seedlings planted in autumn, there was no clear effect of fencing on overall survival rates (fenced: 20–88%; unfenced: 24–68% after two growing seasons). Methods: Through 1985, three plots were each planted with 250 baldcypress seedlings: 200 in February/March and 50 in September. Of these seedlings, 75 were protected with chickenwire fencing whilst 175 were left unfenced (open to herbivory by nutria Myocastor coypus). Seedlings were stored cold (4°C) before planting. Plots contained other trees (330–590 stems/ha) and saplings/shrubs (1,000–3,500 stems/ha) and had variable water levels. Survival of planted baldcypress seedlings was recorded in October 1985–1987.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Directly plant trees/shrubs: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated study in 1985–1987 in a floodplain swamp in Louisiana, USA (Conner & Flynn 1989) reported variable survival and changes in average height of planted baldcypress Taxodium distichum seedlings, depending on protection from herbivores, water levels and season of planting. Statistical significance was not assessed. Overall, 0–88% of seedlings survived over 2–3 growing seasons. In five of seven cases with data, the average height of surviving seedlings was greater after 2–3 growing seasons (76–130 cm) than it had been after one growing season (60–102 cm). Seedlings protected from herbivores had higher survival than unprotected seedlings when planted in the spring, but not when planted in autumn (see Action: Use fences or barriers to protect planted areas). Amongst protected seedlings, survival was higher in drier plots after a wet year (1986; driest plot: 84–88%; wettest plot: 52–70%) but higher in wetter plots after a dry year (1987; driest plot: 20–40%; wettest plot: 52–70%). Methods: In 1985, three plots (flooded at different depths and for different durations) were each planted with 250 baldcypress seedlings: 200 in February/March and 50 in September. Chickenwire fences protected 75 seedlings/plot from herbivores (especially nutria Myocastor coypus). Seedlings were root-pruned and stored cold (4°C) before planting. Plots contained other trees (330–590 stems/ha) and saplings/shrubs (1,000–3,500 stems/ha). Baldcypress seedling survival and height were recorded in October 1985, 1986 and 1987.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

Output references

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