Study

An integrated approach for assessing translocation as an effective conservation tool for Hawaiian monk seals

  • Published source details Norris T.A., Littnan C.L., Gulland F.M.D., Baker J.D. & Harvey J.T. (2017) An integrated approach for assessing translocation as an effective conservation tool for Hawaiian monk seals. Endangered Species Research, 32, 103-115

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate marine and freshwater mammals to re-establish or boost native populations

Action Link
Marine and Freshwater Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate marine and freshwater mammals to re-establish or boost native populations

    A controlled study in 2008–2011 at two islands in the North Pacific Ocean, Hawaii, USA (Norris et al. 2017) reported that at least half of translocated Hawaiian monk seal Neomonachus schauinslandi pups survived their first year, and survival rates were greater than those of non-translocated pups remaining at the original site. Results are not based on assessments of statistical significance. At least six of 12 seal pups (50%) survived to one year of age after translocation. Survival of translocated seal pups was higher than that of non-translocated seal pups remaining at the original site (11 of 36 pups, 31%). However, the authors state that survival estimates may not be reliable due to small sample sizes and low survey effort at the release site (<1% of that at the original site). In August 2008 and 2009, twelve newly weaned seal pups (average 78 days old) were translocated 450 km to an island with better foraging conditions to improve their chances of survival. Attempts were made to re-sight the 12 translocated seal pups and 36 non-translocated seal pups of the same age during surveys. Biannual surveys were carried out at the release site during a total of 12 days in 2009–2011. Surveys of non-translocated pups were carried out at the original site in 2009–2011 (details not reported).

    (Summarised by: Anna Berthinussen)

Output references

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