Study

Twenty-six years of post-release monitoring of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris): Evaluation of a cooperative rehabilitation program

  • Published source details Adimey N.M., Ross M., Hall M., Reid J.P., Barlas M.E., Diagne L.W.K. & Bonde R.K. (2016) Twenty-six years of post-release monitoring of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris): Evaluation of a cooperative rehabilitation program. Aquatic Mammals, 42, 376-391

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release captive-bred marine and freshwater mammals to re-establish or boost native populations

Action Link
Marine and Freshwater Mammal Conservation

Hand-rear orphaned or abandoned marine and freshwater mammal young

Action Link
Marine and Freshwater Mammal Conservation

Rehabilitate and release injured, sick or weak marine and freshwater mammals

Action Link
Marine and Freshwater Mammal Conservation
  1. Release captive-bred marine and freshwater mammals to re-establish or boost native populations

    A replicated study in 1988–2013 at multiple freshwater, marine and brackish water sites in Florida, USA (Adimey et al. 2016) found that two of 14 captive-born Florida manatees Trichechus manatus latirostris released into the wild survived for at least one year. Two of 14 captive-born manatees (14%) survived for at least one year in the wild after release, occupied appropriate habitats, did not need to be rescued and were in good condition. The other 12 manatees required additional rescue(s) or medical treatment or died within the first year (number for each not reported). All of 14 manatees born in captivity were tagged and released (aged between <1 and >10 years old) at warm freshwater, marine or brackish water sites (number of each not reported) used by wild manatees.  Each of 14 released manatees was monitored with radio-tracking and visual observations once or twice/week for at least one year in 1988–2013.

    (Summarised by: Anna Berthinussen)

  2. Hand-rear orphaned or abandoned marine and freshwater mammal young

    A replicated study in 1988–2013 at multiple freshwater, marine and brackish water sites in Florida, USA (Adimey et al. 2016) found that 24 of 40 (60%) orphaned Florida manatee Trichechus manatus latirostris calves reared in captivity and released back into the wild survived for at least one year. Twenty-four of 40 orphaned, captive-reared manatee calves survived for at least one year in the wild after release, occupied appropriate habitats, did not require additional rescue and were in good condition. The other 16 manatee calves required intervention or died within the first year (number for each not reported). All of 40 manatees were rescued as calves (<235 cm in length) and kept in captivity for between <1 and >10 years before release back into the wild. Release sites were warm freshwater, marine or brackish water near rescue locations or alternative locations used by wild manatees (number of sites for each not reported). Each of 40 released manatees was monitored with radio-tracking and visual observations once or twice/week for at least one year in 1988–2013.

    (Summarised by: Anna Berthinussen)

  3. Rehabilitate and release injured, sick or weak marine and freshwater mammals

    A replicated study in 1988–2013 at multiple freshwater, marine and brackish water sites in Florida, USA (Adimey et al. 2016) found that 41 of 51 (80%) sick or injured Florida manatees Trichechus manatus latirostris that were rehabilitated released back into the wild survived for at least one year. Twenty-two of 25 sick manatees (88%) and 19 of 26 injured manatees (73%) that were rescued and rehabilitated survived for at least one year in the wild after release, occupied appropriate habitats, did not require additional rescue and were in good condition. Three sick and seven injured manatees required intervention or died within the first year (number for each not reported). Twenty-five rescued manatees were sick (exposed to toxic algae or severe cold weather) and 26 were injured (by boat collisions, fishing gear or entrapment). All 51 manatees were rehabilitated in captivity for between <1 and >10 years before being released back into the wild. Release sites were warm freshwater, marine or brackish water near rescue locations or alternative locations used by wild manatees (number of sites for each not reported). Each of 51 released manatees was monitored with radio-tracking and visual observations once or twice/week for at least one year in 1988–2013.

    (Summarised by: Anna Berthinussen)

Output references

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