Study

An actively stimulating net panel and rope array inside a model cod-end to increase juvenile red seabream escapement

  • Published source details Kim Y. & Whang D. (2010) An actively stimulating net panel and rope array inside a model cod-end to increase juvenile red seabream escapement. Fisheries Research, 106, 71-75

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Fit a moving device to a trawl net to stimulate fish escape response (stimulator device)

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Fit a moving device to a trawl net to stimulate fish escape response (stimulator device)

    A replicated, controlled study in 2009 in laboratory facilities in Tongyoung, South Korea (Kim & Whang 2010) found that trawl net codends fitted with moving devices to stimulate fish escape response (active stimulating devices) increased the escape of immature red seabream Pagrus major compared to conventional trawls, and the effect was influenced by mesh size and light level. In a 28 mm mesh codend, fewer immature seabream were retained with a stimulating device than without in dark and bright conditions (dark: 74 vs 83%, bright: 80 vs 87%). However, there was no statistical difference in dim light (device: 66, without: 82 %). For a 43 mm mesh, the codend with a stimulating device retained fewer seabream than a conventional codend in all light conditions (dark: 78 vs 87%, dim: 46 vs 65%, bright: 37 vs 49%). In 2009, groups of immature seabream were released into 40 cm diameter codends (28 mm or 43 mm mesh size) in a laboratory tank. For each mesh size, codends with and without one of two active stimulating devices (fluttering panels of netting, 60 x 40 cm; and an array of 11 ropes, 70 cm long) were tested at one of three light conditions (dark, dim, bright). Each trial was repeated 10 times for random groups of fish (120 trials) with 200 fish released into the codend each time.

    (Summarised by: Leo Clarke)

Output references

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