Study

Implications for reed bed management of mowing and burning of common reed Phragmites australis stands, Trebon Biosphere Reserve, Czech Republic, and Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve, Romania

  • Published source details Rolletschek H., Rolletschek A., Hartzendorf T. & Kohl J. (2000) Physiological consequences of mowing and burning of Phragmites australis stands for rhizome ventilation and amino acid metabolism. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 8, 425-433

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use prescribed fire to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Cut/mow herbaceous plants to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Use prescribed fire to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

    A site comparison study in 1996–1997 of two reedbeds in Romania (Rolletschek et al. 2000) found that a burned reedbed contained fewer, shorter, thinner common reed common reed Phragmites australis shoots than an unburned reedbed, and a lower reed biomass. In the spring after intervention, the burned reedbed contained fewer reed shoots (40 shoots/m2) than the unburned reedbed (105 shoots/m2). Reed shoots in the burned reedbed were also shorter (burned: 150 cm; unburned: 194 cm) and thinner (burned: 9.9 mm; unburned: 12.9 mm). Accordingly, the peak above-ground biomass was lower in the burned reedbed (burned: 2,738 g/m2; unburned: 3,468 g/m2; statistical significance not assessed). Methods: In September 1996 (biomass) and May 1997 (all other metrics), vegetation was surveyed in two reedbeds with comparable nutrient levels: one burned in the previous winter, and one that had not been burned. The reedbeds were not flooded between burning and measurement. Surveys included measurements of 25 shoots/reedbed, and counts of shoots in five 1-m2 quadrats/reedbed.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Cut/mow herbaceous plants to maintain or restore disturbance: freshwater marshes

    A site comparison study in 1996 of two adjacent reedbeds in the Czech Republic (Rolletschek et al. 2000) found that a mown reedbed contained more, taller and thicker common reed Phragmites australis shoots than an unmown reedbed. The mown reedbed contained 79 reed shoots/m2, compared to 49 shoots/m2 in the unmown reedbed (statistical significance not assessed). Reed shoots in the mown reedbed were significantly taller (mown: 256 cm; unmown: 171 cm) and thicker (mown: 7.1 mm; unmown: 6.0 mm). Methods: In August 1996, vegetation was surveyed in two reedbeds with comparable nutrient levels: one mown in the previous winter, and one that had not been mown. The reedbeds were flooded between mowing and measurement. Surveys involved measurements of 25 shoots/reedbed, and counts of shoots in five 1-m2 quadrats/reedbed.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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