Study

Behavioural responses of draughtboard sharks (Cephaloscyllium laticeps) to rare earth magnets: Implications for shark bycatch management within the Tasmanian southern rock lobster fishery

  • Published source details Westlake E.L., Williams M. & Rawlinson N. (2018) Behavioural responses of draughtboard sharks (Cephaloscyllium laticeps) to rare earth magnets: Implications for shark bycatch management within the Tasmanian southern rock lobster fishery. Fisheries Research, 200, 84-92.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Attach an electropositive deterrent to fishing gear

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Attach an electropositive deterrent to fishing gear

    A replicated, controlled study in 2014 in shallow inshore waters in the Tasman Sea off Tasmania, Australia (Westlake et al. 2018) found that the presence of magnets reduced feeding attempts on bait by draughtboard sharks Cephaloscyllium laticeps, compared to bait without magnets. When magnets were present, sharks made 25 and 19 feeding attempts (for two and four magnets respectively), and 53 attempts were made with no magnets. The bait was approached but no feeding was attempted 174 times with two magnets present, 144 times with four magnets present and 123 times with no magnets present. A total of 12 trials were carried out on separate occasions between August–December 2014, each with the following three treatments placed 20 metres apart: two or four magnetic resin blocks attached to rods 0.2 m either side of jack mackerel Trachurus declivis bait, and two non-magnetic blocks on rods either side of the bait. Each device was placed on the seabed and recorded by video for 90 minutes.

    (Summarised by: Rosslyn McIntyre)

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust