Study

Do rare-earth metals deter spiny dogfish? A feasibility study on the use of electropositive “mischmetal” to reduce the bycatch of Squalus acanthias by hook gear in the Gulf of Maine

  • Published source details Tallack S.M.L. & Mandelman J.W. (2009) Do rare-earth metals deter spiny dogfish? A feasibility study on the use of electropositive “mischmetal” to reduce the bycatch of Squalus acanthias by hook gear in the Gulf of Maine. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 66, 315-322.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Attach an electropositive deterrent to fishing gear

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Attach an electropositive deterrent to fishing gear

    A replicated, controlled study in 2007 in an area of pelagic water in the Gulf of Maine, USA (Tallack & Mandelman 2009) found that attaching mischmetal (a nonmagnetic metal alloy) to commercial and recreational hook fishing gears did not reduce catches of spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias compared to hooks with no mischmetal. Total numbers of dogfish caught with mischmetal present was not statistically different from when mischmetal was absent for commercial longlines (present: 221 fish; absent: 244 fish) or rod and reel (jig) gear (present: 14 fish; absent: 16 fish). Fishing took place in August/September 2007 over 10 days. Pieces of mischmetal (45 × 45 mm and 5 mm thick) were attached 10 cm above the hook and bait on longlines and jigging gears. A total of 21 longlines (2,080 hooks, half with mischmetal and half without) were set for 1–2 h. Jigging using rod and reel took place during the longline deployments. Three rod and reels were configured with two hooks, one with mischmetal attached and one without. Seventy-three jig lines were set (146 baited hooks, half with mischmetal, half without). Captured fish were recorded by hook and bait type.

    (Summarised by: Natasha Taylor)

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust