Study

Selective commercial line fishing and biodiversity conservation co-exist on seamounts in a deepwater marine reserve

  • Published source details Williams A., Upston J., Green M. & Graham K. (2016) Selective commercial line fishing and biodiversity conservation co-exist on seamounts in a deepwater marine reserve. Fisheries Research, 183, 617-624

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Deploy fishing gear at selected times (day/night) to avoid unwanted species

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation

Deploy fishing gear at selected depths to avoid unwanted species

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Deploy fishing gear at selected times (day/night) to avoid unwanted species

    A replicated, controlled study (year not stated) of two seamount marine reserves in the South Pacific Ocean 200 km off New South Wales, Australia (Williams et al. 2016) found that selective fishing at specific times and depths avoided the unwanted catch of Harisson’s dogfish Centrophorus harrissoni in a restricted commercial blue-eye trevalla Hyperoglyphe antarctica handline fishery. Across areas, catch rates were lower (0 fish/100 hooks) during the day at seamounts 280–550 m deep (defined as being ‘non-dogfish habitat’), but not at the deeper seamounts (0.4 fish/100 hooks), compared to seamounts at 280–550 m during the night (0.1 fish/100 hooks), both of the latter defined as ‘dogfish habitat’. Catches of trevalla were highly variable but appeared slightly lower in the ‘non-dogfish’ habitat’ compared to the ‘dogfish habitat’ (non-dogfish: 8.2–34.3 fish/100 hooks, dogfish: 9.1–48.9 fish/100 hooks; data not tested for significance). Hydraulically powered handlines with 18 hooks each were deployed during 10 vessel trips 4-5 days long during the day in mid-water (depths) and deep-water (depths), and at night in mid-water. In ‘other habitat’ 1,036 handline deployments were carried out and 407 in ‘dogfish habitat’. Handlines were deployed at randomly selected positions and hauled after 5-10 minutes or until it was felt several fish had been hooked. Details of when the study took place were not provided. Fish were identified and counted.

  2. Deploy fishing gear at selected depths to avoid unwanted species

    A replicated, controlled study (year not stated) of two seamount marine reserves in the Tasman Sea, Australia (Williams et al. 2016) found that fishing at specific depths and times reduced unwanted catch of endangered Harrison’s dogfish Centrophorus harrissoni in a restricted commercial blue-eye trevalla Hyperoglyphe antarctica handline fishery. Catch rates were lower (0 fish/100 hooks) on seamounts defined as being ‘non-dogfish habitat’, combining selected depths (280–550 m) and time of day (daytime) compared to ‘dogfish habitat’ (280–550 m, night: 0.1 fish/100 hooks; 550–830 m, day: 0.4 fish/100 hooks). Catches of trevalla were highly variable but appeared slightly lower in the ‘non-dogfish’ habitat’ compared to the ‘dogfish habitat’ (non-dogfish: 8.2–34.3 fish/100 hooks, dogfish: 9.1–48.9 fish/100 hooks; data not tested for significance). Hydraulically powered handlines with 18 hooks each were deployed during 10 vessel trips 4–5 days long during the day in mid-water (280–550 m) and deep-water (550–830 m), and at night in mid-water. In ‘non-dogfish habitat’ 1,036 handline deployments were carried out and 407 deployments were in ‘dogfish habitat’. Handlines were deployed at randomly selected positions and hauled after 5–10 minutes or until it was felt several fish had been hooked. Details of when the study took place were not reported. Fish were identified and counted.

Output references

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