Study

Fisheries replenishment of early life taxa: potential export of fish eggs and larvae from a temperate marine protected area

  • Published source details Crec'hriou R., Alemany F., Roussel E., Chassanite A., Marinaro J.Y., Mader J., Rochel E. & Planes S. (2010) Fisheries replenishment of early life taxa: potential export of fish eggs and larvae from a temperate marine protected area. Fisheries Oceanography, 19, 135-150.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Cease or prohibit all types of fishing in a marine protected area

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Cease or prohibit all types of fishing in a marine protected area

    A site comparison study in 2004 of the water column around an island in the Mediterranean Sea off Mallorca, Spain (Crec'hriou et al. 2010) found that there were more eggs of four commercially targeted fish species inside a no-take (no fishing) marine reserve enforced for three years and in which the adult fish were more abundant, compared to outside (thus protecting a spawning area from fishing and increasing the likelihood of successful egg production). The eggs of all four species/groups (scorpion fish Scorpaena spp., Mediterranean rainbow wrasse Coris julis, brown meagre Sciaena umbra and grouper Epinephelus spp.) were distributed in higher densities inside the non-fished reserve compared to locations outside, up to two nautical miles away (data reported as statistical results and presented graphically). In addition, there was a clear gradient of decreasing egg density with distance away from the reserve for wrasse and grouper. Plankton was collected in July 2004 inside and outside the marine section of the Cabrera National Park (87 km2, designated 1991, enforced 2001) by two methods: bongo nets (27 stations inside and outside, repeated four times) and fixed nets (9 stations inside). Bongo nets were deployed in down and up oblique tows between the surface and 10 m off the seabed (down) and horizontally for five minutes at 20, 10 and 2 m depths (up). Fish eggs (sub-sampled over 200) were identified and counted in the laboratory under a microscope.

    (Summarised by: Natasha Taylor)

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