Study

Supplementing electronic tagging with conventional tagging to redesign fishery closed areas

  • Published source details Le Bris A., Fréchet A. & Wroblewski J.S. (2013) Supplementing electronic tagging with conventional tagging to redesign fishery closed areas. Fisheries Research, 148, 106-116.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Protect spawning fish from capture

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation

Establish temporary fishery closures

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Protect spawning fish from capture

    A study in 2007–2012 of a seabed area in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Northeast Atlantic Ocean, Canada (Le Bris et al. 2013) found that tagged adult Atlantic cod Gadus morhua showed frequent and long-term use over five years of a seasonally closed area designed to protect a cod spawning aggregation from fishing mortality. These results were not statistically tested. Tagged adult cod spent an average 28% of time (range 0–72%) inside the closed area during its enforcement period and were recaptured after between 224–746 days, indicating long-term survival. Movement patterns of different groups of cod indicated that migratory cod used the area more extensively (13–72%) than non-migratory cod (0%). In addition, 17 tags from the 353 adult cod tagged were returned (i.e. captured; the fate of the other 336 is unknown). A closed area of 5,000 km2 was implemented in 2002 prohibiting all ground fishing activities yearly from April 1st to June 15th. Between 2007–2012, a total of 353 cod were captured using baited handlines and surgically implanted with data storage tags. Of the 17 tags returned, complete data from 14 were used to reconstruct cod movements.

    (Summarised by: Natasha Taylor)

  2. Establish temporary fishery closures

    A study in 2007–2012 of a seabed area in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Northeast Atlantic Ocean, Canada (Le Bris et al. 2013) found that over five years tagged adult cod Gadus morhua showed frequent and long-term use of a seasonally closed spawning area established for five years that prohibited fishing for bottom dwelling fish, and thus had increased protection from fishing. Data were not statistically tested. Tagged adult cod spent an average 28% of time (range 0–72%) inside the closed area during its enforcement period and were at liberty for 224–746 days before capture, indicating long-term survival. Movement patterns of different groups of cod indicated that migratory cod used the area more extensively (13–72%) than non-migratory cod (0%). In addition, 17 tags from the 353 adult cod tagged were returned (i.e. captured; the fate of the other 336 is unknown). A closed area of 5,000 km2 was implemented in 2002 prohibiting all ground fishing activities yearly from April 1st to June 15th. Between 2007–2012, a total of 353 cod were captured using baited handlines and surgically implanted with data storage tags. Of the 17 tags returned, complete data from 14 were used to reconstruct cod movements.

    (Summarised by: Natasha Taylor)

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