Study

Some effects of marine reserve protection on the population structure of two spearfishing target-fish species, Dicentrarchus labrax (Moronidae) and Sparus aurata (Sparidae), in shallow inshore waters, along a rocky coast in the northwestern Mediterranean

  • Published source details Jouvenel J.Y. & Pollard D.A. (2001) Some effects of marine reserve protection on the population structure of two spearfishing target-fish species, Dicentrarchus labrax (Moronidae) and Sparus aurata (Sparidae), in shallow inshore waters, along a rocky coast in the northwestern Mediterranean. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 11, 1-9.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Cease or prohibit spearfishing

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Cease or prohibit spearfishing

    A site comparison study in 1995 of coastal waters in the Mediterranean Sea, southwestern France (Jouvenel & Pollard 2001) found that prohibiting spearfishing in a marine reserve for an unknown number of years, resulted in higher abundance and greater length of European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax and higher abundance of gilthead seabream Sparus aurata, compared to unprotected fished areas. Average abundance of both species was higher inside the reserve (seabass: 3.9 fish/400 m, bream: 0.7 fish/400 m) than outside (seabass: 0.7 fish/400 m, bream: 0.1 fish/400 m). Average length of seabass was higher inside the reserve (381 mm) compared to outside (212 mm). In addition, average length of gilt head bream was lower inside the reserve (379 mm) than outside (400 mm), but this was not tested statistically due to low sample size outside of the reserve. Data were collected in July 1995 over 26 km of coastline with varied habitat types from Cape Bear to Terrimbau Bay. In the centre is the Banyuls-sur-Mer marine reserve (10 km), where spearfishing was banned throughout (year implemented not reported), but other fishing practices were allowed. Snorkellers counted and recorded lengths of all seabass and gilthead bream along 64 transects of 400 m within 5 m of the shore.

    (Summarised by: Leo Clarke)

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