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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Evidence for male-biased dispersal in a reintroduced population of burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur at Heirisson Prong, Western Australia

Published source details

Parsons B.C., Short J.C. & Calver M.C. (2002) Evidence for male-biased dispersal in a reintroduced population of burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur at Heirisson Prong, Western Australia. Australian Mammalogy, 24, 219-224


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1998–2000 in an arid protected area in Western Australia, Australia (Parsons et al. 2002) found that after releasing captive-bred burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur into a fenced area without predators, the population persisted for at least eight years. In 1992 an unspecified number of bettongs were released onto a 1,200-ha peninsula, fenced to exclude predators. In July 1998, February and August 1999, and February 2000, the population was surveyed using unspecified methods.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)