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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of grazing management on resource selection by a small mammal in a temperate desert of South America

Published source details

Spirito F., Rowland M., Nielson R., Wisdom M. & Tabeni S. (2017) Influence of grazing management on resource selection by a small mammal in a temperate desert of South America. Journal of Mammalogy, 98, 1768-1779


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Reduce intensity of grazing by domestic livestock Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 2002–2005 at two heathland sites in Norway (Spirito et al. 2017) found that excluding livestock with fences did not significantly change abundances of field voles Microtus agrestis. The number of animals trapped in plots that were fenced to exclude livestock did not differ significantly (6 animals/plot) from that in plots that were not fenced to exclude livestock (4 animals/plot). In 2002, at two sites, four 50 × 50-m plots were fenced to exclude livestock and four plots were not fenced. Sheep density prior to fencing was 32–48 sheep/ha. In June and August 2003–2005, thirty-six live traps baited with sunflower seeds and peanuts and with wool for bedding were placed in each plot and checked twice daily for five days. Captured animals were individually marked and released.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)