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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Quantifying predation attempts on arboreal marsupials using wildlife crossing structures above a major road

Published source details

Soanes K., Mitchell B. & van der Ree R. (2017) Quantifying predation attempts on arboreal marsupials using wildlife crossing structures above a major road. Australian Mammalogy, 39, 254-257


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install pole crossings for gliders/flying squirrels Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2007–2015 at five points along a highway through woodland in Victoria, Australia (Soanes et al. 2017) found that arboreal marsupials using artificial road crossing structures did not suffer high predation rates when doing so. Among 13,488 detections of arboreal marsupials using glider pole crossings and rope bridges combined (separate figures not given in paper), there were no recorded instances of attempted predation of those using glider poles. One unsuccessful predation attempt was recorded from a rope bridge. In July 2007, five crossing structures were installed along 70 km of highway. Three were poles for gliders (one or two poles/crossing, 12–14 m tall) and two were rope mesh canopy bridges (70 m long, 5 m wide). Crossings were monitored with motion and heat activated cameras from July 2007 to February 2015. Cameras recorded 5–10 images, 3 s apart (2007–2011) or a 10–20 s video (2011–2015). Predation attempts were detectable when animals were ≤1 m from the top of each glider pole or ≤5 m from each end of a canopy bridge.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)

Install rope bridges between canopies Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2007–2015 at five points where a highway bisected woodland in Victoria, Australia (Soanes et al. 2010) found that arboreal marsupials using rope bridges did not suffer high predation rates when doing so. Among 13,488 detections of arboreal marsupials (from rope bridges and glider pole crossings combined – separate figures not given in paper), there was one recorded predation attempt. This was an unsuccessful night-time predation attempt on a squirrel glider Petaurus norfolcensis using a rope bridge, by an unidentified bird. In July 2007, five crossing structures were installed along 70 km of highway. Two were rope mesh canopy bridges (70 m long, 5 m wide) and three were poles for gliders (one or two poles/crossing, 12–14 m tall). Crossings were monitored with motion and heat activated cameras, from July 2007 to February 2015. Cameras recorded 5–10 images, 3 s apart (2007–2011) or a 10–20 s video (2011–2015). Predation attempts were detectable when animals were ≤5 m from each end of a canopy bridge, and ≤1 m from the top of each glider pole.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)