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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Movements and establishment of reintroduced European otters Lutra lutra,/i>

Published source details

Sjöåsen T. (1997) Movements and establishment of reintroduced European otters Lutra lutra,/i>. Journal of Applied Ecology, 34, 1070-1080


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1989–1992 at seven lakes in boreal forest in Sweden (Sjöåsen 1997; same experimental set-up as Sjöåsen 1996) found that following release, at least 14 of 36 captive-bred or wild-born translocated European otters Lutra lutra survived for at least one to two years. Fourteen otters had established home ranges and were still alive when last recorded, 362–702 days after release. Eight further otters were monitored until their transmitters failed or they moved out of radio contact, 89–219 days after release. Fourteen were known to have died, 18–750 days after release. Otter origin (captive-bred or wild-caught) did not affect movement distance. In 1989–1992, thirty-six otters (25 captive-bred and 11 wild-born, translocated otters) were released in lakes and rivers in southern Sweden. Otters were fitted with radio-transmitters. Radio-tracking was carried out at least monthly, in 1989–1992.

(Summarised by Abby Machernis )

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1989–1992 at seven lakes in boreal forest in Sweden (Sjöåsen 1997; same experimental set-up as Sjöåsen 1996) found that following release of European otters Lutra lutra (a mix of wild-caught translocated and captive-bred animals), at least 38% survived for almost a year or longer. Fourteen otters established home ranges and were still alive when last recorded, 362–702 days after release. Eight further otters were monitored until their transmitters failed or they moved out of radio contact, 89–219 days after release. Fourteen were known to have died, 18–750 days after release. Otter origin (wild-caught or captive-bred) did not affect movement distance. In 1989–1992 thirty-six otters (11 wild-caught, translocated animals and 25 captive-bred) were released in lakes and rivers in southern Sweden. Otters were fitted with radio-transmitters. Radio-tracking was carried out at least monthly, in 1989–1992.

(Summarised by Abby Machernis )