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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Successful reintroduction of the brushtail possum to Wadderin Sanctuary in the eastern wheatbelt of Western Australia

Published source details

Short J. & Hide A. (2014) Successful reintroduction of the brushtail possum to Wadderin Sanctuary in the eastern wheatbelt of Western Australia. Australian Mammalogy, 36, 229-241


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2010–2013 in a forest and shrubland reserve in Western Australia, Australia (Short & Hide 2014) found that following translocation into a predator-resistant fenced area, brushtail possums Trichosurus vulpecula numbers increased over the three years following release. Of five animals released in a formal translocation program, only one, a female, survived >8 months. This animal was still alive after three years. However, including survivors and progeny from four possums informally released two year earlier, there were 19 possums known to be alive three years after formal translocations. Twenty further possums were recorded over this time, of which most are presumed to have subsequently died or left the sanctuary area. Four possums caught on nearby farms were informally released within a 427-ha predator-fenced sanctuary in 2008. Five possums were translocated and released at the same site in winter 2010. Possums were monitored by radio-tracking and by 3–4 live-trapping surveys/year in 2010–2013.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)