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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Investigations into the health of brush-tailed rock-wallabies (Petrogale penicillata) before and after reintroduction

Published source details

Schultz D.J., Rich B.G., Rohrig W., McCarthy P.J., Mathews B., Schultz T.J., Corrigan T. & Taggart D.A. (2011) Investigations into the health of brush-tailed rock-wallabies (Petrogale penicillata) before and after reintroduction. Australian Mammalogy, 33, 235-244


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2007–2010 of a primarily woodland and shrubland site in Victoria, Australia (Schultz et al. 2011) found that captive-bred brush-tailed rock-wallabies Petrogale penicillata placed in a holding pen prior to release exhibited stress levels consistent with maintaining good health. Stress index values measured from blood samples of released animals, were not significantly different to those of animals held in captivity before release. For both groups, the levels indicated lower levels of stress-induced cellular damage than the animals were able to mitigate. Of 41 captive-born wallabies, 24 (aged 1.1–4.3 years) were selected, following health examinations, for transfer to a 1.3-ha pre-release enclosure. They were kept in this enclosure for 3–17 months. Shelter was provided in the enclosure but animals foraged on natural foods, except during trapping procedures. Twenty-one were then released between November 2008 and October 2010. Samples were taken from 11 that were subsequently recaptured, up to October 2010.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)