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Individual study: Do koalas Phascolarctos cinereus use trees planted on farms? A case study from north-west New South Wales, Australia

Published source details

Rhind S.G., Ellis M.V., Smith M. & Lunney D. (2014) Do koalas Phascolarctos cinereus use trees planted on farms? A case study from north-west New South Wales, Australia. Pacific Conservation Biology, 20, 302-312


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Plant trees on farmland Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 2006 of 19 tree plots in New South Wales, Australia (Rhind et al. 2014) found that trees planted on farmland were used by koalas Phascolarctos cinereus. Of the 19 plots surveyed, 14 had evidence of use by koalas. In eight plots, over 40% of trees inspected were used by koalas. Koala pellets were recorded under 16 of 25 tree species or species groups inspected. Trees closer to potential source populations and older trees were more likely to be used by koalas (results presented as statistical model). Nineteen plots (15 linear tree corridors and four patches of trees), aged 6–15 years (planted 1990–2001) were studied (plot sizes not stated). Plots were on 10 farms and in two roadside plantings. Every fifth tree (>2 m high), along pre-determined transects of up to 100 trees/plot, was assessed for presence of koala pellets within a 1-m radius of the tree base.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)