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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of bait containing triclabendazole to treat Fascioloides magna infections in free-ranging white-tailed deer

Published source details

Qureshi T., Drawe D.L., Davis D.S. & Craig T.M. (1994) Use of bait containing triclabendazole to treat Fascioloides magna infections in free-ranging white-tailed deer. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 30, 346-350


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use drugs to treat parasites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled, before-and-after study in 1987–1989 in a grassland wildlife refuge in Texas, USA (Qureshi et al. 1994) found that feeding white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus medicated corn reduced trematode Fascioloides magna parasite infection by 63%. Four weeks after treatment with triclabendazole, fewer white-tailed deer were infected with live parasites (2/23) than in baited control (15/24) and unbaited control areas (24/30). Before treatment, the number of infected deer was similar (area to be treated: 8/9; baited control: 4/8; unbaited control: 5/8). In winter 1987–1989, at each of 10 sites across a 391-ha treatment pasture and 10 sites across 421-ha of baited control pasture, untreated corn was distributed for 3–4 weeks, before corn containing triclabendazole (500 ml triclabendazole/23 kg corn) was used in the treatment pasture for a further week. The estimated dose was 11 mg/kg body weight/deer/day for seven days. Corn was placed at dusk, and deer were counted at each bait site between 2100–2300 hr. At a third, 439-ha unbaited control pasture, no corn was distributed. In January 1987, before baiting began, 13 fawns and 12 adult deer were shot across the three areas. In 1987–1989, four weeks after baiting finished, 6–15 adult deer were shot on each pasture. The liver of each deer was examined for parasites.

(Summarised by Andrew Bladon)