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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Demography of bridled nailtail wallabies translocated to the edge of their former range from captive and wild stock

Published source details

Pople A.R., Lowry J., Lundie-Jenkins G., Clancy T.F., McCallum H.I., Sigg D., Hoolihan D. & Hamilton S. (2001) Demography of bridled nailtail wallabies translocated to the edge of their former range from captive and wild stock. Biological Conservation, 102, 285-299


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1996–1999 at a woodland reserve in Queensland, Australia (Pople et al. 2001) found that captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies Onychogalea fraenata released from holding pens in areas where mammalian predators had been controlled had similar annual survival rates to that of wild-born translocated animals. Over four years, the average annual survival of released captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies (57–92%) did not differ significantly from that of wild-born translocated animals (77–80%). In 1996–1998, one hundred and twenty-four captive-bred and nine wild-born translocated bridled nailtail wallabies were released into three sites across Idalia National Park. Ten captive-bred wallabies were held in a 10-ha enclosure within the reserve for six months before release, and 85 were bred within the 10-ha enclosure. All of the 133 released wallabies were kept in a holding pen (30-m diameter) for one week at each site before release. Mammalian predators were culled at release sites. A total of 67 wallabies (58 captive-bred, nine wild-born) were radio-tagged and tracked every 2–7 days in 1996–1998. Wallabies were live-trapped at irregular intervals with 20–35 wire cage traps in 1997–1999.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals to areas outside historical range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1996–1999 in a woodland reserve in Queensland, Australia (Pople et al. 2001) found that translocated, captive-bred and enclosure born bridled nailtail wallabies Onychogalea fraenata released into areas outside their historical range had annual survival rates of 40–88% and the population increased three-fold over four years. The average annual survival of bridled nailtail wallabies varied by release group between 40 and 88%. During four years, in which 133 wallabies were released, the population increased to approximately 400 individuals. In 1996–1997, nine wild-born translocated and 39 captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies were released in three sites across Idalia National Park. In 1997–1998, eighty-five wallabies born (from captive animals) within a 10 ha enclosure on the reserve were also released. All released wallabies were kept in a holding pen (30 m diameter) for a week at each site before release. Mammalian predators were culled at release sites. Wallabies were individually marked with ear tags. A total of 37 wallabies (9 wild-born translocated, 28 captive-bred) were radio-tagged and tracked every 2–7 days in 1996–1998. Wallabies were live-trapped at irregular intervals with 20–35 wire cage traps in 1997–1999. Vehicle spotlight surveys were carried out 3–4 times/year in 1996–1999.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1996–1999 at a woodland reserve in Queensland, Australia (Pople et al. 2001) found that captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies Onychogalea fraenata kept in holding pens where predators were controlled prior to release had similar average annual survival after release to that of wild-born translocated animals. Over four years, the average annual survival of captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies (57–92%) did not differ significantly from that of wild-born translocated animals (77–80%). In 1996–1998, one hundred and twenty-four captive-bred and nine wild-born translocated bridled nailtail wallabies were released into three sites across Idalia National Park. Ten captive-bred wallabies were held in a 10-ha enclosure within the reserve for six months before release, and 85 were bred within the 10-ha enclosure. All of the 133 released wallabies were kept in a holding pen (30-m diameter) for one week at each site before release. Mammalian predators were culled at release sites. A total of 67 wallabies (58 captive-bred, nine wild-born) were radio-tagged and tracked every 2–7 days in 1996–1998. Wallabies were live-trapped at irregular intervals with 20–35 wire cage traps in 1997–1999.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1996–1999 at a woodland reserve in Queensland, Australia (Pople et al. 2001) found that wild-born translocated bridled nailtail wallabies Onychogalea fraenata kept in holding pens prior to release into areas where predators had been controlled had similar average annual survival to that of captive-bred animals. Over four years, the average annual survival of wild-born translocated wallabies (77–80%) did not differ significantly from that of captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies (57–92%). In 1996–1998, nine wild-born translocated and 124 captive-bred bridled nailtail wallabies were released into three sites across Idalia National Park. Ten captive-bred wallabies were held in a 10-ha enclosure within the reserve for six months before release, and 85 were bred within the 10-ha enclosure. All of the 133 released wallabies were kept in a holding pen (30-m diameter) for one week at each site before release. Mammalian predators were culled at release sites. A total of 67 wallabies (58 captive-bred, nine wild-born) were radio-tagged and tracked every 2–7 days in 1996–1998. Wallabies were live-trapped at irregular intervals with 20–35 wire cage traps in 1997–1999.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)